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I have two different namespaces, with lots of classes with the same name. I believe some code will make it easier to understand:

namespace Print.Pdl.PostScript.Operators
{
    public abstract class BaseOperator : IOperator
    {
         // ...
    }
}

namespace Print.Pdl.Pcl6.Operators
{
    public abstract class BaseOperator : IOperator
    {
         // ...
    }
}

The basic implementation is the same, as PostScript and PCL have similar constructs. So, both namespaces end up having identical names to several classes.

I am tempted to do the following...

namespace Print.Pdl.PostScript.Operators
{
    public abstract class BasePsOperator : IPsOperator
    {
         // ...
    }
}

namespace Print.Pdl.Pcl6.Operators
{
    public abstract class BasePclOperator : IPclOperator
    {
         // ...
    }
}

... but, IMHO, it kind of defeats the purpose, as there is a redundancy in the identification. Why should I prefix/change the classes names, if the namespace already creates a logical barrier?

So, what you people think? Should I keep the identical names, as they are in different namespaces, or should I prefix/change the classes names to make it easier to identify the source, and avoid conflicts if someone wants to use both namespaces together?

Thanks!

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Does this question really have an answer? Or is it a matter of taste? –  Ricardo Nolde Apr 25 '11 at 17:47
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6 Answers

It's a tricky question IMO. To answer it well, you need to know how often people are likely to use both namespaces at once, and how annoyed they get at having to prefix everything with a namespace.

I personally tend to lean towards the "different names". I think of the namespaces as a mechanism to limit the set of names visible in the code, and a safeguard against the unlikely event that names clash even within this reduced set. So keeping the clash "unlikely" is important. Therefore, I personally wouldn't design with a clash on purpose.

Especially since in your case the difference is so small: BaseOperator is only a tad shorter than BasePsOperator.

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It really depends on how often the classes in the namespaces will be instantiated in the same class. If that doesn't happen often, then giving them the same name is fine. Also, remember that you aren't exactly stuck with your decision: Visual Studio sports some decent refactor tools that will help you rename your classes if you change your mind later. –  Charlie Kilian Apr 19 '11 at 13:45
1  
But with the ability to create namespace alias in C#, shouldn't I leave to programmers to use using Print.Pdl.PostScript.Operators = PsOps instead of changing names? And remember that the above is just one example: there are several classes with identical names. –  Ricardo Nolde Apr 19 '11 at 13:48
    
@Charlie Well almost - it depends on how often you are "using" both namespaces at once. Even if you only ever instantiate the Ps.Operator, having both Ps and Pcl namespaces in "using" will force you to write out the "Operator" with the namespace. –  romkyns Apr 19 '11 at 13:52
    
@Ricardo yes, but that makes the code less readable. Programmer one calls it PsOps, programmer two calls it Ps. So file 1 has PsOps.Operator and file 2 has Ps.Operator. This is bad for readability. –  romkyns Apr 19 '11 at 13:53
1  
@Tim Actually, they are the same thing, in different contexts. :) –  Ricardo Nolde Apr 20 '11 at 13:29
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Nolde,

I don't think you should sacrifice the architecture in favor of readability. I believe its more intuitive if you keep the same class names as this makes it simpler if you are switching from PCL to PostScript and vice-versa.

If you have to use both classes in the same code file, create an alias for the namespace. It will be very clear to read:

using Pcl = Print.Pdl.Pcl6.Operators;
using PostScript = Print.Pdl.PostScript.Operators;
...
// use PCL
Pcl.BaseOperator.DoSomething();
// Use PostScript
PostScript.BaseOperator.DoSomething();

Thanks, Luciano Bargmann

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I like the aliases as well. Maybe different developers will use different aliases for these namespaces? Yes. But I don't see this as a major readability problem. As for using both namespaces in a same file, that shouldn't be a problem as well, as that would generate an error telling BaseOperator is ambiguous. –  diogoriba Apr 20 '11 at 17:19
1  
I kind of agree, but is this really an "architecture issue"? Nothing will change in the way the classes work, or how they will relate with other classes. Just the name changes. Should I really worry about it? –  Ricardo Nolde Apr 25 '11 at 20:46
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If there's no functional or interface difference between the two proposed base classes then maybe create another, general namespace with the BaseOperator in it - and just define it once.

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1  
This is a good advice, but it is not the case here - these classes are semantically similar, as PostScript and PCL6 have similar structure, but they behave differently enough to make a single class not practical. –  Ricardo Nolde Apr 19 '11 at 13:55
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My opinion is you should use a naming scheme reflecting specialization.

I mean you don't need to think about if it's a prefix, suffix or any other. Just write names that may clearly identify classes.

Honestly I believe namespacing wouldn't repleace a right class naming scheme, because namespaces are an organizational thing while classes are part of what your program does.

So, at the end of the day, I'd choice your second option: specialized naming for namespaces and classes.

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Developers maintaining the code after you will appreciate it if you try and avoid duplicating class names. It just makes it hard to tell at a glance what class is being used.

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Different namespaces are just that... Different, name, spaces so you shouldn't worry at all (generally) about duplicate names across namespace boundaries.

However, you should be conscious of usage. e.g. you are creating a layered app with many different layers (in different namespaces), you would not want to duplicate class names that might be shared across layers.

If you feel it is sensible to use duplicate naming between namespaces, you can always use the handy using statements for renaming in consuming classes e.g.

you have two User classes :

Data.Entities.User;
App.Core.User;

And want to use them in the same place...

You can use a simple using statement such as

using HttpUser = App.Core.User; 

To alias one of them and so avoiding full qualification, and avoiding any confusion.

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