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I am very new to Indexes in MySQL. I know, I should probably have leart it earlier, but most projects been small enough for me to get away with out it ;)

So, now I am testing it. I did my test by running EXPLAIN on a query:

Query:

EXPLAIN SELECT a . *
FROM `tff__keywords2data` AS a
LEFT JOIN `tff__keywords` AS b ON a.keyword_id = b.id
WHERE (
b.keyword = 'dog' || b.keyword = 'black' || b.keyword = 'and' || b.keyword = 'white'
)
GROUP BY a.data_id
HAVING COUNT( a.data_id ) =4 

First, without indexes I got these results:

enter image description here

Then, with index on data_id and keyword_id i got this:

enter image description here

So as I understand, the number of rows MySQL has to search goes from 61k down to 10k which must be good right?

So my question is, am I correct here? And is there anything else I could think about when trying to optimize?

UPDATE:

Further more, after some help from AJ and Piskvor pointing out my other table and its column keyword not having index I got this:

enter image description here

Great improvement! Right?

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6  
+1 for taking the time to author the question with a complete query and output from EXPLAIN, and formatting it! –  AJ. Apr 19 '11 at 14:27
    
thats much better now jamie :) 4 & 6 rows –  wired00 Apr 19 '11 at 14:59
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As you see, the key used for table b is still NULL. You may want to add an index on b.keyword and match with

WHERE b.keyword IN ('dog','black','and','white')

This is functionally different from your WHERE clause, although it returns the same results.

As it looks, you may be interested in fulltext searching.

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Beat me to the punch... –  AJ. Apr 19 '11 at 14:30
1  
Sometimes it is better to let MySQL do the table scan rather than inflate the index file. Also, if the column contains data whose cardinality is low, then there's no need in indexing it. Indexing keywords might prove as performance drop rather than gain, so without knowing more info, suggesting to index the keyword column might prove as wrong choice. –  Michael J.V. Apr 19 '11 at 14:43
1  
@Michael: MySQL is quite good in estimating cardinality. In most cases, if it sees the index is less efficient it just won't use it. –  Quassnoi Apr 19 '11 at 14:51
2  
@jamietelin: an index lookup implies an extra join with the table itself (called table lookup) which takes extra time, if the columns which are not a part of the index are used in the query. Retrieving a single record from an index scan takes several times as much time as doing it from a table scan. Thus, the index scan is only useful if the benefits of filtering outweigh the drawbacks of the table lookup. If many records satisfy the condition, the table scan with filtering is cheaper. MySQL, though, tries to calculate it automatically, and does it quite well. –  Quassnoi Apr 19 '11 at 14:57
2  
I agree, and the reason I mentioned it is so that jamietelin can research the topic further and gain better understanding of indexes and indexing strategies. –  Michael J.V. Apr 19 '11 at 15:04
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Depending on what you want to achieve, you should either replace the LEFT JOIN with the INNER JOIN or move your WHERE condition into the ON clause:

As it is now:

SELECT  a.*
FROM    `tff__keywords2data` AS a
LEFT JOIN
        `tff__keywords` AS b
ON      b.id = a.keyword_id
WHERE   b.keyword = 'dog' || b.keyword = 'black' || b.keyword = 'and' || b.keyword = 'white'
GROUP BY
        a.data_id
HAVING  COUNT( a.data_id ) = 4 

your query is in fact an INNER join (since you have non-null conditions in the WHERE clause).

Also, instead of using bit arithmetics (which is not sargable) you should use native OR or IN constructs:

SELECT  a.*
FROM    `tff__keywords2data` AS a
JOIN    `tff__keywords` AS b
ON      b.id = a.keyword_id
WHERE   b.keyword IN ('dog', 'black', 'and', 'white')
GROUP BY
        a.data_id
HAVING  COUNT(*) = 4 

You may also want to create an index on ttf__keywords (keyword) which can filter on the keywords you are searching for and make less records to be selected from the leading b.

Finally, if you don't need implicit ordering on a.data_id, get rid of it by appending ORDER BY NULL:

SELECT  a.*
FROM    `tff__keywords2data` AS a
JOIN    `tff__keywords` AS b
ON      b.id = a.keyword_id
WHERE   b.keyword IN ('dog', 'black', 'and', 'white')
GROUP BY
        a.data_id
HAVING  COUNT(*) = 4 
ORDER BY
        NULL

This will remove filesort from your plan.

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Thanks for pointing this out. And I have now tested it, but it doesn't seem like it changes anything, at least not when i check EXPLAIN SELECT. INNER and LEFT gives exact same result. Is it still an improvement? –  jamietelin Apr 19 '11 at 15:00
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Yep thats improved (but from quickly looking i think can be more improved). what you can see is that the query optimiser is now seeing AND USING keyword_id index. it has reduced the rows its searching from 64283 down to 10216. but this is still using a filesort which hopefully someone else can clarify is similar to a SQL Server table scan? which isn't good... i could be wrong there though.

You should be able to now reduce the rows from table b down below 10216

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You're doing a string comparison to b.keyword....add an index there.

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Use an INNER JOIN instead of a LEFT JOIN. A left join will return unmatched rows in the join table which I don't think you need here.

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Correct! if you do LEFT JOIN and you don't limit results of the first table in WHERE clause, all rows will be returned. This means complete table scan and index won't help. If you use INNER JOIN the index on data.id will be used to filter results. Well, that's only if you don't need the non-matched rows for some reason. –  NickSoft Apr 19 '11 at 14:38
    
I tested this, but it doesn't seem like it changes anything, at least not when i check EXPLAIN SELECT. INNER and LEFT gives exact same result. Is it still an improvement? –  jamietelin Apr 19 '11 at 14:42
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Try putting indexes on everything in a WHERE clause, and anything in a JOIN, so that would be:

a.keyword_id b.id b.keyword

You may also want to try adding an index to a.data_id, as it's in a "GROUP BY". Too many indexes is usually not a problem, unless you're adding large volumes of data to large tables - that can cause INSERTs to be very slow.

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