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I override ProcessCmdKey and when I get Keys argument, I want to check if this Keys is Letter or Digit or Special Symbol.

I have this snippet

    protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
    {
            char key = (char)keyData;
            if(char.IsLetterOrDigit(key)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(key);
            }
            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
    }

Everything works for letters and digits. but when I press F1-F12 it converts them to letters.

Maybe someone knows better way to solve this task?

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The problem is you're casting keyData to a character. You can't do that. You have to use the constants defined in the Keys enumeration to get this information. –  Cody Gray Apr 19 '11 at 15:34
    
May be you could Try stackoverflow.com/questions/887377/… –  01010111 01010011 Apr 9 at 8:57
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Override the form's OnKeyPress method instead. The KeyPressEventArgs provides a KeyChar property which allows you to utilize the static methods on char.

As mentioned by Cody Gray in the comments, this method only fires on key strokes that have character information. Other key strokes such as F1-F12 should be processed in OnKeyDown or OnKeyUp, depending on your situation.

From MSDN:

Key events occur in the following order:

The KeyPress event is not raised by noncharacter keys; however, the noncharacter keys do raise the KeyDown and KeyUp events.

Example

protected override void OnKeyPress(KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
  base.OnKeyPress(e);
  if (char.IsLetter(e.KeyChar))
  {
    // char is letter
  }
  else if (char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar))
  {
    // char is digit
  }
  else
  {
    // char is neither letter or digit.
    // there are more methods you can use to determine the
    // type of char, e.g. char.IsSymbol
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this happens at a much higher level than the ProcessCmdKey, and it's subject to missing certain keypresses for various reasons. If it works for your purposes, great. But it's important to realize that it might not—it is not a drop-in replacement with equivalent functionality and purpose. –  Cody Gray Apr 20 '11 at 3:32
    
Definitely not, OnKeyPress only provides the KeyChar and nothing else, which is why it is so fitting for this specific situation. Other key strokes should be processed in OnKeyDown. –  mbjdev Apr 20 '11 at 8:24
    
.. or OnKeyUp for that matter. I've updated the answer with more info. –  mbjdev Apr 20 '11 at 8:34
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Try

if( !(keyData >= Keys.F1 && keyData <= Keys.F12))
{
    char key = (char)keyData;
    if(char.IsLetterOrDigit(key))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(key);
        return false;
    }

}
return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't need to do something when F1-F12 pressed. I need to check if I pressed letter,digit or special symbol –  Zlobaton Apr 19 '11 at 15:27
    
@Zlobato how about this edited answer? –  Bala R Apr 19 '11 at 15:33
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Try using keyData.KeyCode and maybe even testing within a range instead of using the Char.IsLetterOrDigit. e.g.

if (keyData.KeyCode >= Keys.D0 && keyData.KeyCode <= Keys.Z) {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about special symbols + = - / \ ? and e.t.c –  Zlobaton Apr 19 '11 at 15:21
    
@Zlobaton: You mean Keys.Add, Keys.Subtract, Keys.Divide, etc.? –  Brad Christie Apr 19 '11 at 15:38
1  
And bang, all users of your software that use a non-Latin-based keyboard (e.g. Russian, Greek, Hindi, ...) experience completely broken software. There is a reason for the existence of char.IsLetterOrDigit et al. — use them. –  Timwi Apr 19 '11 at 15:40
    
I mean all symbols that you can type. –  Zlobaton Apr 19 '11 at 15:40
    
@Timwi: The point I was stressing was KeyCode exists (and not to start off with a cast). You're absolutely right, it would not be universal. –  Brad Christie Apr 19 '11 at 15:45
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if (keyData >= Keys.F1 && keyData <= Keys.F12)
{
     //one of the key between F1~F12 is pressed
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't need to do something when F1-F12 pressed. I need to check if I pressed letter,digit or special symbol –  Zlobaton Apr 19 '11 at 15:27
    
@Zlobaton: Define special symbol. –  Danny Chen Apr 19 '11 at 15:32
    
+ = - / \ ? and e.t.c –  Zlobaton Apr 19 '11 at 15:33
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you need either a giant switch/case statement or check for ranges. You may find it easier to check for the keys you want to exclude, depending on which there is fewer of. Look at this for all the possible values. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.keys.aspx

if (keyData >= Keys.A && keyData <= Keys.Z)
   // do something

or

switch(keyData) {
case Keys.Add:
case Keys.Multiply:
// etc.
   // do something
   break;
}
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I have tried the following code but for some reason char.IsLetter() method is recognising the following keys as Letters???

F1, F8, F9, F11, F12, RightShift, LeftShift, RightAlt, RightCtrl, LeftCtrl, LeftWin, RightWin, NumLock.

This method doesn't seem to be that full proof regarding what it thinks is a letter.

if(char.IsLetter((char)e.Key) || char.IsDigit((char)e.Key))
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