Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Simplified code (no caching)

First a piece of simplified code, which I'll use to explain the problem.

def integrate(self, function, range):
    # this is just a naive integration function to show that
    # function needs to be called many times
    sum = 0
    for x in range(range):
        sum += function(x) * 1
    return sum

class Engine:
    def __init__(self, capacity):
        self.capacity = capacity

class Chasis:
    def __init__(self, weigth):
        self.weight = weight

class Car:
    def __init__(self, engine, chassis):
        self.engine = engine
        self.chassis = chassis
    def average_acceleration(self):
        # !!! this calculations are actually very time consuming
        return self.engine.capacity / self.chassis.weight
    def velocity(self, time):
        # here calculations are very simple
        return time * self.average_acceleration()
    def distance(self, time):
        2 + 2 # some calcs
        integrate(velocity, 2000)
        2 + 2 # some calcs

engine = Engine(1.6)
chassis = Chassis(500)
car = Car(engine, chassis)
car.distance(2000)
chassis.weight = 600
car.distance(2000)

Problem

Car is the main class. It has an Engine and a Chassis.

average_acceleration() uses attributes from Engine and Chassis and performs very time consuming calculations.

velocity(), on the other hand, perfoms very simple calculations, but uses a value calculated by average_acceleration()

distance() passes velocity function to integrate()

Now, integrate() calls many times velocity(), which calls each time average_acceleration(). Considering that the value returned by average_acceleration() depends only on Engine and Chassis, it'd be desirable to cache the value returned by average_acceleration().

My ideas

First attempt (not working)

Fist I though about using a memoize decorator in the following manner:

    @memoize
    def average_acceleration(self, engine=self.engine, chassis=self.chassis):
        # !!! this calculations are actually very time consuming
        return engine.capacity / chassis.weight

But it won't work as I want, because Engine and Chassis are mutable. Thus, if do:

chassis.weight = new_value

average_acceleration() will return wrong (previously cached) value on the next call.

Second attempt

Finally I modified the code as follows:

    def velocity(self, time, acceleration=None):
        if acceleration is None:
            acceleration = self.average_acceleration()
        # here calculations are very simple
        return time * acceleration 
    def distance(self, time):
        acceleration = self.average_acceleration()
        def velocity_withcache(time):
            return self.velocity(time, acceleration)
        2 + 2 # some calcs
        integrate(velocity_withcache, 2000)
        2 + 2 # some calcs

I added the parameter acceleration to velocity() method. Having that option added, I calculate acceleration only once in distance() method, where I know that chassis and engine objects are not changed and I pass this value to velocity.

Bottom line

The code I wrote does what I need it to do, but I'm curious if you can come up with someting better/cleaner?

share|improve this question
2  
+1 Probably the best written homework question I've seen. (I assume this is homework) –  Doug T. Apr 19 '11 at 15:38
    
Thanks. Actually this is not a homework, but I'm not a professional programmer, so I guess it may look like one ;-) –  Patrick Apr 19 '11 at 15:41
    
If the acceleration is constant (as it appears to be in the distance method), then you should be able to compute the distance with calculus, no computational integration necessary. distance = 1/2 * acceleration * time**2. –  unutbu Apr 19 '11 at 16:47
    
@unutbu, Obviously this is, as I did point out, simplified code. My real calculations are way more complex, I just tried to boil down here what my problem with caching is about. –  Patrick Apr 19 '11 at 17:11

3 Answers 3

The fundamental problem is one that you've already identified: you're trying to memoize a function that accepts mutable arguments. This problem is very closely related to the reason python dicts don't accept mutable built-ins as keys.

It's also a problem that's very simple to fix. Write a function that only accepts immutable arguments, memoize that, and then create a wrapper function that extracts the immutable values from the mutable objects. So...

class Car(object):
    [ ... ]

    @memoize
    def _calculate_aa(self, capacity, weight):
        return capacity / weight

    def average_acceleration(self):
        return self._calculate_aa(self.engine.capacity, self.chassis.weight)

Your other option would be to use property setters to update the value of average_acceleration whenever relevant values of Engine and Chassis are changed. But I think that might actually be more cumbersome than the above. Note that for this to work, you have to use new-style classes (i.e. classes that inherit from object -- which you should really be doing anyway).

class Engine(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._weight = None
        self.updated = False

    @property
    def weight(self):
        return self._weight

    @weight.setter
    def weight(self, value):
        self._weight = value
        self.updated = True

Then in Car.average_acceleration() check whether engine.updated, recalculate aa if so, and set engine.updated to False. Pretty clunky, seems to me.

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically a fix for my first approach. I have already considered this solution and the problem I see, is that, what if self.engine.capacity and self.chassis.weight are mutable as well? Than I would have to go kind of "one layer deeper", right? This is potentially cumbersome. But maybe this is the only solution if I want to use memoization, because a cache key containig all variables must be created. On the other hand, maybe there is some other smart solution out there. –  Patrick Apr 19 '11 at 18:09
    
Honestly, the other solution to this problem that I can see is more cumbersome; see above. –  senderle Apr 19 '11 at 18:15
    
Also, don't you already have to go "one layer deeper" to do your calculations? Surely your calculations are being done on immutable objects. So just memoize at whatever the lowest level is. –  senderle Apr 19 '11 at 18:27
    
That is what @Zirak proposed in his answer and I agree this is less good. Yet, out of these two choices and my solution, I choose mine. But I guess yours would be the only solution in the case of more random access to average_acceleration(). –  Patrick Apr 19 '11 at 18:28
2  
Honestly, the more I think about it, the more I feel that my solution is best, because it achieves greater separation of concerns. You shouldn't have a function that does complex calculations and navigates a complex object hierarchy at the same time. Navigate the object hierarchy in a separate function and pass immutable objects to another function for calculation. –  senderle Apr 19 '11 at 18:35

There are various decorator implementations available on PyPI dealing with caching return value and taking the function parameters into account.

Check for gocept.cache or plone.memoize on PyPI.

share|improve this answer

Why not just assign the long calculation as a property, and calculate it on initialization? If you need to calculate it again (e.g. you change the engine) then and only then would you need to call it again.

class Car:
    def __init__(self, engine, chassis):
        self.engine = engine
        self.chassis = chassis
        self.avg_accel = self.average_acceleration()
    def average_acceleration(self):
        # !!! this calculations are actually very time consuming
        return self.engine.capacity / self.chassis.weight
    def velocity(self, time):
        # here calculations are very simple
        return time * self.avg_accel
    def distance(self, time):
        2 + 2 # some calcs
        integrate(velocity, 2000)
        2 + 2 # some calcs
    def change_engine(self, engine):
        self.engine = engine
        self.avg_accel = self.average_acceleration()
share|improve this answer
    
What in case engine would be modified not through Car interface (outside the class)? Engine would have to be deepcopy'ed to make it work. But even then no changes could be made to engine inside car class, only new instance (or deep copy) could be created. Moreover, setter for each component, i.e. engine, chassis, etc., would be needed. This seems to be more messy than my solution. –  Patrick Apr 19 '11 at 17:38
    
Why? You still have the same reference to engine, and as said, if you want to make any changes to the engine, re-run the operation. –  Zirak Apr 19 '11 at 18:01
    
I mean, if I do somethink like this: engine.capacity = 800, the cached value of average_acceleration will not be reset. –  Patrick Apr 19 '11 at 18:16
    
How is that different than your solution? –  Zirak Apr 19 '11 at 20:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.