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shell gurus,

I have a bash shell script, in which I launch a background function, say foo(), to display a progress bar for a boring and long command:

foo()
{
    while [ 1 ]
    do
        #massively cool progress bar display code
        sleep 1
    done
}

foo &
foo_pid=$!

boring_and_long_command
kill $foo_pid >/dev/null 2>&1
sleep 10

now, when foo dies, I see the following text:

/home/user/script: line XXX: 30290 Killed                  foo

This totally destroys the awesomeness of my, otherwise massively cool, progress bar display. How do I get rid of this message?

tia, prmatta

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2  
+1 for using 'massively cool' in re: a bash script :) –  pepoluan Apr 19 '11 at 16:10
    
I can't reproduce this even after changing kill foo_pid to kill $foo_pid. –  Tanktalus Apr 19 '11 at 16:40
    
@Tanktalus, I think that is because the script probably dies before the output is sent to stderr. I have added a sleep at the end of the pseudo code which should enable you to recreate the issue. –  prmatta Apr 19 '11 at 17:38
    
while [ 1 ]; do can be written as while :; do. –  TrueY Jun 28 '13 at 9:04

9 Answers 9

up vote 22 down vote accepted
kill $foo_pid
wait $foo_pid 2>/dev/null

BTW, I don't know about your massively cool progress bar, but have you seen Pipe Viewer (pv)? http://www.ivarch.com/programs/pv.shtml

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Suprisingly when I give -9 to kill it does not work. –  Mustafa Nov 5 '13 at 19:48
    
This doesn't work for me. I still get "Killed by signal 15." written to the terminal. I am trying to do this over ssh - I start a session and start a process, then later I ssh again and kill the process. When I try 'wait $pid', it says that the process is not a child (I think because it is a different session), and then the "Killed by signal 15." is still written to the terminal. Is there a way to suppress this in this situation? –  David Doria Mar 17 at 19:32

Try to replace your line kill $foo_pid >/dev/null 2>&1 with the line:

(kill $foo_pid 2>&1) >/dev/null
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just tested this. good try - but no dice. thanks. –  prmatta Apr 19 '11 at 16:31
1  
Helped me when trying to kill non existing processes to prevent the kill foo_pid failed: no such process message –  Koen. Aug 12 '12 at 12:58

This is a solution I came up with for a similar problem (wanted to display a timestamp during long running processes). This implements a killsub function that allows you to kill any subshell quietly as long as you know the pid. Note, that the trap instructions are important to include: in case the script is interrupted, the subshell will not continue to run.

foo()
{
    while [ 1 ]
    do
        #massively cool progress bar display code
        sleep 1
    done
}

#Kills the sub process quietly
function killsub() 
{

    kill -9 ${1} 2>/dev/null
    wait ${1} 2>/dev/null

}

foo &
foo_pid=$!

#Add a trap incase of unexpected interruptions
trap 'killsub ${foo_pid}; exit' INT TERM EXIT

boring_and_long_command

#Kill foo after finished
killsub ${foo_pid}

#Reset trap
trap - INT TERM EXIT
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This "hack" seems to work:

# Some trickery to hide killed message
exec 3>&2          # 3 is now a copy of 2
exec 2> /dev/null  # 2 now points to /dev/null
kill $foo_pid >/dev/null 2>&1
sleep 1            # sleep to wait for process to die
exec 2>&3          # restore stderr to saved
exec 3>&-          # close saved version

and it was inspired from here. World order has been restored.

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This works, but there is no need for the >/dev/null 2>&1 part after kill $foo_pid as stderr (which is where the unwanted text is coming from) is already directed to /dev/null –  Lee Netherton Apr 19 '11 at 16:43

Just came across this myself, and realised "disown" is what we are looking for.

foo &
foo_pid=$!
disown

boring_and_long_command
kill $foo_pid
sleep 10

The death message is being printed because the process is still in the shells list of watched "jobs". The disown command will remove the most recently spawned process from this list so that no debug message will be generated when it is killed, even with SIGKILL (-9).

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Add at the start of the function:

trap 'exit 0' TERM
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In regards using 'wait': this is the best answer I think. See http://stackoverflow.com/a/10200191/1208218 for an example of how this looks/works.

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Another way to do it:

    func_terminate_service(){

      [[ "$(pidof ${1})" ]] && killall ${1}
      sleep 2
      [[ "$(pidof ${1})" ]] && kill -9 "$(pidof ${1})" 

    }

call it with

    func_terminate_service "firefox"
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Yet another way to disable job notifications is to put your command to be backgrounded in a sh -c 'cmd &' construct.

#!/bin/bash

foo()
{
   while [ 1 ]
   do
       sleep 1
   done
}

#foo &
#foo_pid=$!

export -f foo
foo_pid=`sh -c 'foo & echo ${!}' | head -1`

# if shell does not support exporting functions (export -f foo)
#arg1='foo() { while [ 1 ]; do sleep 1; done; }'
#foo_pid=`sh -c 'eval "$1"; foo & echo ${!}' _ "$arg1" | head -1`


sleep 3
echo kill ${foo_pid}
kill ${foo_pid}
sleep 3
exit
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