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In a click event, I invoke a PageMethods request, which contains two callback functions: OnServerValidationSuccess and OnServerValidationFailure. I also try and set create an object called clientResult;

    var clientResult = { rc: "", msg: "" };

    $('#btnSave').click( function () {
        PageMethods.ServerValidateCreateCompany(companyName, domainName, country, OnServerValidationSuccess, OnServerValidationFailure);
        alert(clientResult.rc); //this is null!
});

In the OnServerValidationSuccess, the result parameter contains the asynchronous response. And in there I try to assign it to clientResult.

//On Success callback
function OnServerValidationSuccess(result, userContext, methodName) {
    clientResult = result;
    if (clientResult.msg.length != 0) {
        document.getElementById('resMsg').innerHTML = clientResult.msg;
        $('#resMsg').addClass('warning');
    }
}

I assign the result to local clientResult variable in the callback function. It should contain the fully formed server response, which is sent correctly by the server-side WebMethod. However, it remains null or empty after PageMethod is called. What must I do in order to assign the variable set in the callback to a local variable so that I can access it?

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What does your PageMethod look like? It's hard to tell without seeing that. –  steve_c Apr 19 '11 at 16:32
    
On a side note, I would advocate using an HttpHandler over a PageMethod. It's going to be a lot less overhead than using a Page. –  steve_c Apr 19 '11 at 16:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You seem to be assigning the value to clientResult correctly, you're just accessing it too early.

You're making an asynchronous/non-blocking call which means that it returns immediately but continues to work in the background. So your JavaScript immediately returns from the call to PageMethods.ServerValidateCreateCompany and moves on to the alert. But your request hasn't had time to complete and your success callback (OnServerValidationSuccess) hasn't even run yet so you get undefined or null.

You should invoke whatever function is going to process the response in the OnServerValidationSuccess function which is where the response will be received. Perhaps something like this (you already seem to doing something with msg, just move your work with rc here as well)

//On Success callback
function OnServerValidationSuccess(result, userContext, methodName) {
    clientResult = result;
    alert(clientResult.rc); //this will work
    process(clientResult); //process the response here
    if (clientResult.msg.length != 0) {
        document.getElementById('resMsg').innerHTML = clientResult.msg;
        $('#resMsg').addClass('warning');
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. The reason I have not done all the handling in the OnServerValidationSuccess is because the PageMethod is called in a click event handler and the response contains logic to conditionally return true/false for form validating and submitting. Which is why I need the scope of the clientResult variable to be made outside of the callback method. –  woodfly Apr 19 '11 at 16:46
    
I'm not sure I understand, the scope of the clientResult is still the same as before, it's just being accessed at a different place. –  no.good.at.coding Apr 19 '11 at 17:05
    
I think I see what you need - you want to submit/cancel submission of the form depending on whether the server says the entries are valid and you want to use the clientResult.rc value as the check. Off the top of my head, you might force the request to be synchronous but that's usually NOT recommended because it'll cause your page to lock up until the response comes back. –  no.good.at.coding Apr 19 '11 at 17:08
    
You were right, synchronous was the way to go. I abandoned using PageMethods because it is asynchronous by default and this behaviour can't be overridden. So I went with the much lower-level jquery $.ajax(), and assigned the 'async' property to false. Also it doesn't inject the patch with loads of unwanted script dross to enable it to work. jquery saved the day again! –  woodfly Apr 21 '11 at 12:04
    
I meant to write "inject the page" not "inject the patch". –  woodfly Apr 21 '11 at 12:44

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