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Today, when I write a piece of code like this:

try
{
   ...
}
catch (Exception e)
{
   ...
}

I suddenly realize that the

catch (Exception e)
{
  ...
}

statement is so much like a function declaration. And I vaguely remembered that the exception handling involves some kind of stack walking/manipulation.

So, what exactly is the above exception handling code compiled into? I have the feeling that the above code is just a special/convenient syntax to ease our coding, but in fact, maybe our code is wrapped into an auto-generated exception handling function? I hope I made myself clear.

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In addition to the resources provided @siride I believe you want to look at the article Microsoft Enterprise Library 5.0 Exception Handling Block. There are resources at that link and the ability to download the application block's source code that might help you find what you are looking for. note I am not recommending that you use the code block wholesale, but rather I believe that inspecting the code and the explanation of the code will help you learn what you want to know. –  Cos Callis Apr 19 '11 at 16:32
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Fortunately for you CLR architect Chris Brumme wrote a long explanation of how exception handling works in the CLR. Now, this was written eight years ago and a few of the details are slightly different today, but this should at least give you a good start.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cbrumme/archive/2003/10/01/51524.aspx

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Impressive; it's not often I encounter a blog post that could serve as a whole chapter in a book. –  Dan Bryant Apr 19 '11 at 19:24
    
Thanks Eric, you have helped me a lot. –  smwikipedia Apr 21 '11 at 16:24
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This is a good place to start: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/5b2yeyab.aspx#how_the_runtime_manages_exceptions

Basically, they are kind of like functions, but not really. They aren't called, per se, they have no separate stack frame (or separate stack, for that matter), using the current function's stack frame instead. That's why you can access local variables.

If you want to see what it compiles into, you can use ILDasm.exe to decompile an assembly that has exception blocks (so make a sample program and decompile it). Alternatively, use RedGate's Reflector for a better decompiling experience.

If the IL isn't enough, you can get at the generated assembly by running your program in debug mode in Visual Studio, setting a breakpoint in your method and then when that breakpoint is hit, opening the disassembly tab/window from the Debug menu.

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Thanks, it helps, too. But I can only mark one answer. –  smwikipedia Apr 21 '11 at 16:31
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