Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use the C++ standard library's find algorithm like this:

  template<class T>
  const unsigned int AdjacencyList<T>::_index_for_node(
      const std::vector<T>& list, const T& node
  ) throw(NoSuchNodeException)
  {
    std::vector<T>::iterator iter = std::find(list.begin(), list.end(), node);
  }

When I try to compile, I get these errors:

In file included from ../AdjacencyList.cpp:8:
../AdjacencyList.h: In member function ‘const unsigned int Graph::AdjacencyList<T>::_index_for_node(const std::vector<T, std::allocator<_Tp1> >&, const T&)’:
../AdjacencyList.h:99: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘iter’
../AdjacencyList.h:100: error: ‘iter’ was not declared in this scope
In file included from ../AdjacencyListTest.cpp:9:
../AdjacencyList.h: In member function ‘const unsigned int Graph::AdjacencyList<T>::_index_for_node(const std::vector<T, std::allocator<_Tp1> >&, const T&)’:
../AdjacencyList.h:99: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘iter’
../AdjacencyList.h:100: error: ‘iter’ was not declared in this scope
../AdjacencyList.h: In member function ‘const unsigned int Graph::AdjacencyList<T>::_index_for_node(const std::vector<T, std::allocator<_Tp1> >&, const T&) [with T = int]’:
../AdjacencyList.h:91:   instantiated from ‘const std::vector<T, std::allocator<_Tp1> > Graph::AdjacencyList<T>::neighbours(const T&) [with T = int]’
../AdjacencyListTest.cpp:18:   instantiated from here
../AdjacencyList.h:99: error: dependent-name ‘std::vector::iterator’ is parsed as a non-type, but instantiation yields a type
../AdjacencyList.h:99: note: say ‘typename std::vector::iterator’ if a type is meant

I feel like the "dependent-name ‘std::vector::iterator’ is parsed as a non-type, but instantiation yields a type" bit holds the key to understanding what I'm doing wrong, but my pea-brain cannot extract the meaning.

Update: I needed to add a typename, as per the accepted answer, and also use a const_iterator, so the problematic line of code became:

    typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator iter = std::find(list.begin(), list.end(), node);
share|improve this question
    
There is no std::find in the STL. The std namespace denotes use of the C++ Standard Library. Meanwhile, taking out the use of std::find would have narrowed the question down a little; in this case, you have a dependent name. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 19 '11 at 16:54
4  
One of the rare cases where the last lines of the error message contain the most useful information... –  sth Apr 19 '11 at 16:55
5  
One of the rare cases where an error message from a C++ compiler actually contains a useful, actionable suggestion. ;-) –  James McNellis Apr 19 '11 at 16:56
    
@Tomalak: Yes, you are technically correct. For most intents and purposes, STL == C++ standard library, but there are some differences, and I should have been clear. –  Josh Glover Apr 19 '11 at 16:58
5  
Ugh again with the STL/stdlib argument... don't people ever get tired of it? –  Matteo Italia Apr 19 '11 at 17:05
show 5 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 15 down vote accepted
std::vector<T>::iterator iter = /* ... */; 

iterator is a dependent name (effectively, it depends on the type parameter T). Dependent names are assumed not to name types unless you use typename:

typename std::vector<T>::iterator = /* ... */;

For more, consider reading the Stack Overflow C++ FAQ entry "Where and why do I have to put “template” and “typename” on dependent names?"

You will also need to use const_iterator, since list is const-qualified. You should probably drop the exception specification as well; it's best to "never write an exception specification."

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic answer, James! Actually, it was more of a code review than an answer, but code reviews are always welcome. :) –  Josh Glover Apr 19 '11 at 17:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.