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I want to know that's the diference between:

FOR:

string[] arrayOld = new string(){"This", "other", "aaa", ...};
string[] arrayNew = new string[arrayOld.lenght];

for(int i = i < arrayOld.lenght; i++){
   arrayNew[i] = arrayOld[i];
}

FOREACH:

string[] arrayOld = new string(){"This", "other", "aaa", ...};
List<string> listNew = new List<string>();

foreach(string val in arrayOld){
   listNew.add(val);
}
string[] arrayNew = listNew.toArray();

LINQ:

string[] arrayOld = new string(){"This", "other", "aaa", ...};
string[] arrayNew = (from val in arrayOld select val).toArray();

I don't want to copy an array... The idea is construct new objects from objects in arrayOld (that can be different from string and can contain other attributes...)

I need performance, so...

¿What is the best option and why?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Daniel A. White, Pharabus, R. Martinho Fernandes, Grant Thomas, Graviton Apr 20 '11 at 3:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
have you used a StopWatch before? –  Daniel A. White Apr 19 '11 at 17:11
10  
This code: (from val in arrayOld select val).toArray(); is a great example of why people should be familiar with the non-query-style form of LINQ. To wit: arrayOld.ToArray(); –  Kirk Woll Apr 19 '11 at 17:13
    
@ChaosPandion - In the OPs defence, his code was indented properly. There's a bug in StackOverflow that won't format code inside of numbered/bulleted lists. –  Justin Niessner Apr 19 '11 at 17:34
3  
Why is this question being downvoted and voted for closure? The guy is asking a valid question. –  Robaticus Apr 19 '11 at 17:52
2  
@Robaticus: I can think of several reasons: 1) the question asks for the best, but doesn't say what kind of best. Without a definite purpose there is no best. 2) Initially the question was poorly formatted and underspecified. 3) Now it has several examples of code that does not match the problem (just read the last paragraph.) 4) I don't like questions that amount down to "Can you please compile and run this for me to see which does best?" (which is what the accepted answer does). SO is not everyone's personal human-powered compiler. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 20 '11 at 8:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The crude results speak best for themselves:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        // Warm-up
        Method1();
        Method2();
        Method3();

        const int Count = 1000000;

        var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < Count; i++)
        {
            Method1();
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Method1: {0} ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < Count; i++)
        {
            Method2();
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Method2: {0} ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < Count; i++)
        {
            Method3();
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Method3: {0} ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    }

    static void Method1()
    {
        string[] arrayOld = new[] { "This", "other", "aaa" };
        string[] arrayNew = new string[arrayOld.Length];

        for (var i = 0; i < arrayOld.Length; i++)
        {
            arrayNew[i] = arrayOld[i];
        }
    }

    static void Method2()
    {
        string[] arrayOld = new[] { "This", "other", "aaa" }; 
        var listNew = new List<string>(arrayOld.Length);

        foreach(var val in arrayOld)
        { 
            listNew.Add(val); 
        } 
        string[] arrayNew = listNew.ToArray();    
    }

    static void Method3()
    {
        string[] arrayOld = new[] { "This", "other", "aaa" }; 
        string[] arrayNew = (from val in arrayOld select val).ToArray();    
    }
}

Prints on my machine:

Method1: 72 ms
Method2: 187 ms
Method3: 377 ms
share|improve this answer
1  
But again, in case 2 you're timing the list reallocations. Change case 1 to also use a list. –  Blindy Apr 19 '11 at 17:20
    
@Blindy, I've updated Method2 so that there aren't list reallocations. –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 19 '11 at 17:22
    
I find it surprising that Method2 is quicker since the default size of a List<T> is 4. We may be seeing a bit of sway in the results from the .NET runtime. –  ChaosPandion Apr 19 '11 at 17:27
    
I wanted to make him work his way there instead of handing him the answer :( –  clamchoda Apr 19 '11 at 17:52

None of the above.

If you're trying to copy an array, I would try:

string[] arrayOld = new { "This", "other", "aaa" };
string[] arrayNew = new string[arrayOld.Length];

arrayOld.CopyTo(arrayNew, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Note that in general, specialized methods designed for specific tasks will be as fast or faster manually implemented versions of such methods (because people generally make sure to implement such methods intelligently). So, even without running any benchmarks, I predict this method is competitive in speed with the other listed methods. And it's readable, so stick with it unless you run a profiler and discover it is a bottleneck. Of course, in that case I would further predict your algorithm had an algorithmic flaw rather than needing more efficient array copy routines. –  Brian Apr 19 '11 at 17:51

In most cases, you should choose whatever most clearly expresses intent for the particular code you're writing. If it's a very deep inner loop, however, and you need to squeak out every last nanosecond, my experience has been that (with Release build code) a for loop indexing over an array is measurably faster than a foreach loop, with a slightly smaller performance loss for using delegates with LINQ vs. a simple foreach with the logic inside the loop.

These observations are based on micro-optimization work for score computation algorithms used in AI, where the score function is being evaluated many, many times. The specific bottlenecks and extent of improvements were determined using profiling tools, which I highly recommend if you're in this situation. The bottleneck is rarely where you think it is.

share|improve this answer

As for performance for may exceed that of others as there you directly use indexer where in foreach you are using the Enumerator so you have couple of more lines to execute (GetEnumerator, MoveNext, Current, etc).. But the difference is very subtle and pays for readability and maintainability of the code.

As for LINQ is lot more work. But think Why should LINQ be faster? It also uses loops internally.

Most of the times, LINQ will be a bit slower because it introduces overhead. Do not use LINQ if you care much about performance. Use LINQ because you want shorter better readable and maintainable code.


That said if you are too sensitive about performance and want to churn out every last clock cycle then you may want to use C style pointers in unsafe Context with fixed variables

share|improve this answer
1  
@Blindy - Ummm...that's just plain wrong. A foreach loop has to go through the trouble of getting an Enumerator and enumerating over the collection. A for loop is simple. In cases where a for loop will work for you...it'll be faster. –  Justin Niessner Apr 19 '11 at 17:20
    
@Justin Niessner | so isn't that what i have said.. for is simple and foreach uses Enumerator, can you point out the error please –  Shekhar_Pro Apr 19 '11 at 17:22
    
@Shekhar, I think Justin intended his comment for a different answer (which is now deleted). –  Anthony Pegram Apr 19 '11 at 17:24
    
@Anthony Pegram | oh ok... no prob :) –  Shekhar_Pro Apr 19 '11 at 17:27
    
I have not observed a noticeable improvement with using unsafe pointer de-referencing vs. indexer de-referencing. If you look at the machine code generated for array indexing by the jitter, you'll see that it's using direct relative address de-referencing anyway. –  Dan Bryant Apr 19 '11 at 17:39

The fastest way will be Array.Copy.

string[] arrayOld = new string[] { "This", "other", "aaa" };
string[] arrayNew = new string[arrayOld.Length];

Array.Copy(arrayOld, arrayNew, arrayOld.Length);
share|improve this answer
    
Array.CopyTo always looks clearer to me (And I got you by 6 seconds...hehe). –  Justin Niessner Apr 19 '11 at 17:17

Building of Daniel A. White's comment, not sure if its serious or not, but he's right. Have you ever heard of the StopWatch class?

I think now is the time for you to take a second, and learn how to judge performance for your self. If one of us really wanted to correctly answer your question, we would have to write the performance checking code, which is why your question is probably receiving so many down votes. Because YOU should be doing this. But we will help you :)

You could use the StopWatch Class as well as many other techniques (counting clock cycles / iterations) in order to determine which method has the best performance.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.stopwatch.aspx

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopWatch.Start();
        Thread.Sleep(10000); // put one of your three scenarios here
        stopWatch.Stop();
        // Get the elapsed time as a TimeSpan value.
        TimeSpan ts = stopWatch.Elapsed;

        // Format and display the TimeSpan value.
        string elapsedTime = String.Format("{0:00}:{1:00}:{2:00}.{3:00}",
            ts.Hours, ts.Minutes, ts.Seconds,
            ts.Milliseconds / 10);
        Console.WriteLine("RunTime " + elapsedTime);
    }
}

(code snippet from msdn)

share|improve this answer
    
It's true, but I ask becouse there can be a better way to make things... no more –  Daniel G. R. Apr 19 '11 at 17:45
    
Yes, I would be curious too, no worries. Some people are just really not down to earth. –  clamchoda Apr 19 '11 at 17:50

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