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In boost/utility/swap.hpp I have found this piece of code:

template<class T, std::size_t N>
void swap_impl(T (& left)[N], T (& right)[N])
{
  for (std::size_t i = 0; i < N; ++i)
  {
    ::boost_swap_impl::swap_impl(left[i], right[i]);
  }
}

What are left and right? Are they references to arrays? Is this code allowed by C++ ISO standard 2003 or later?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A reference to an array of type T and length N.

This is a natural extension of C's pointer-to-array syntax, and is supported by C++03.

You could use cdecl.org to try to parse these complex type declarations.

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1  
Why "static"? The arrays could have automatic storage duration. The main point is that this is a reference to an array, not a pointer to one. –  Steve Jessop Apr 19 '11 at 17:44
    
@Steve: I mean, as contrast to dynamic array. –  kennytm Apr 19 '11 at 17:45
    
+1 for cdecl.org –  yasouser Apr 19 '11 at 18:15

What are left and right? Are they references to arrays? Is this code allowed by C++ ISO standard 2003 or later?

Yes. They're references to arrays.

That means, you can call swap_impl as:

int a[10]; //array
int b[10];
//...
swap_impl(a,b); //correct

But you cannot call swap_impl as:

int *a = new int[10]; //pointer 
int *b = new int[10];
//...
swap_impl(a,b); //compilation error

Also note that you cannot do even this:

int a[10];
int b[11];
//...
swap_impl(a,b); //compilation error - a and b are arrays of different size!

Important point:

- Not only arguments must be arrays, but the arrays must be of same size!

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Why "automatic"? The arrays could have static storage duration (for instance globals). The main point is that this is a reference to an array, not a pointer to one. –  Steve Jessop Apr 19 '11 at 18:32
    
@Steve: Edited and corrected. Thanks. :-) –  Nawaz Apr 19 '11 at 18:56

This is the way to declare a reference to an array of T (of size N) named left and right. The code is legal C++.

This allows you to pass in:

int ones[5] = { 1,1,1,1,1 };
int twos[5] = { 2,2,2,2,2 };

swap_impl(ones, twos);

Then template type inference will know that you have T = int and N = 5 and do the in-place swap. If you mismatch the types or the size, you get a handy compilation failure.

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Yes this is standard C++ allowed from very early on (its basically C with the addition of a reference).

Using typedefs makes it easier to read:

int main()
{
    typedef  int (&MyArray)[4];
    int      data[4];
    MyArray  dataRef = data;
}

It sort of mirrors the function typedef

typedef int (*MyFunc)();
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