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I am wondering how do you do constructor inject with ninject 2.0 when you have a base controller?

I have

        private readonly IBaseService baseService;

        public BaseController(IBaseService baseService)
        {
            this.baseService = baseService;

        }


Bind<IBaseService>().To<BaseService>();


public class OtherController : BaseController
{
        private readonly IOtherService otherService;

        public OtherController(IOtherService otherService, IBaseService baseService) 
        {
            this.otherService = otherService;
        }

Yet I get

'BaseController' does not contain a constructor that takes 0 arguments

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1  
I too had this problem, but it smelt awful to me to force all my child controllers to provide the dependency for the base controller. I started with that approach, then refined it so that the base controller fetched an instance of the Ninject Kernel explicitly to resolve it's dependencies. –  ctorx Jan 20 '12 at 21:11
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need to inject both services into your OtherController and call the base constructor passing the service it requires:

public OtherController(IOtherService otherService, IBaseService baseService)
    : base(baseService) { this.otherService = otherService; }
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shoot, i'm too slow. –  qes Apr 19 '11 at 18:27
    
hmm so if your inheriting you have to do it like this? You can't get it to bind the new object sort of like how if it was not inheriting would work? –  chobo2 Apr 19 '11 at 19:17
3  
@chobo2 ignoring dependency injection, but looking at inheritance... if a base class requires a service, it is the responsibility of the inheriting class to provide that. Otherwise the base type cannot be initialised correctly. –  Matthew Abbott Apr 19 '11 at 19:20
    
Best practices or not, I'm not going to pull in the dependency on each controller that uses the base controller. In my constructor of the base controller I'm going to manually resolve it (which is basically the same thing). DependencyResolver.Current.GetService(typeof(ICustomerService)) –  The Muffin Man Nov 5 '13 at 4:24
1  
@LéMuffinMan I can see why you want to do that to make your API simpler, but in terms of testability, you're hiding complexities that aren't exposed through your public API. If it is only you working on the code, fair enough, but working with a team of developers, they may not have intimate knowledge that your subclassed controller requires a dependency provided by service location (using DependencyResolver), which may not be available or configured in a test scenario. –  Matthew Abbott Nov 5 '13 at 9:36
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You'd have to chain through to the base controller, no?

public OtherController(IOtherService otherService, IBaseService baseService) : base(baseService)
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