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Hallo,

I come from a C# background and don't have a lot of C++ experience. To produce clean code I try to separate implementation and interfaces and use inheritance when possible. And when I tried to apply typical C# concepts to C++ I ran into a problem that I've been unable to resolve so far. I assume that this is probably trivial for an experienced C++ programmer but it has been driving me crazy for quite a while.

First I declare a base class (it contains no logic at the moment but it will in the future)

class PropertyBase : public IProperty
{
};

Then I define an interface for the Properties

class IProperty
{
public:
    virtual ~IProperty() {};
    virtual PropertyBase    correct(const ICorrector &corrector) = 0;
    virtual PropertyBase    joinWith(const PropertyBase &partner, const IRecombinator &recombinator) = 0;
};

This is where the problem comes in: The compiler returns errors for the two virtual functions saying that it is not allowed to declare a function that returns an abstract class. Of course I don't want to return an object of the type PropertyBase. I want to declare other classes that inherit from PropertyBase that return an instance of themselves.

Now I've read that a possible way around it is to modify IProperty like this to return pointers:

class IProperty
{
public:
    virtual ~IProperty() {};
    virtual PropertyBase*   correct(const ICorrector &corrector) = 0;
    virtual PropertyBase*   joinWith(const PropertyBase &partner, const IRecombinator &recombinator) = 0;
};

However I would like to avoid this if possible to prevent memory leaks. It would be great if someone would have a better idea to deal with this problem.

Thank you very much

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you're afraid of memory leaks, switch to smart pointers. That has the additional benefit of being self-documenting wrt. ownership of the returned object.

class IProperty
{
public:
    virtual ~IProperty() {};
    virtual std::unique_ptr<PropertyBase> correct(const ICorrector &) = 0;
    virtual std::unique_ptr<PropertyBase> joinWith(const PropertyBase &,
                                                   const IRecombinator &) = 0;
};

In your client code:

std::unique_ptr<PropertyBase> pb(property.correct(corrector));
// use pb and forget about it; smart pointers do their own cleanup

Or, if you want reference counting on the object:

std::shared_ptr<PropertyBase> pb(property.correct(corrector));

See MSDN docs for unique_ptr, shared_ptr.

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This may not be the answer you're looking for, but it seems to me that you are a little confused about pointers and values in C++.

You have to return either a pointer, or a reference, in C++ if you want proper ad-hoc polymorphism. In this case, the compiler issued an error, because the base class was abstract. If instantiating an abstract class would be possible, it would have "holes" in it.

The thumb rule is: Whenever you have a class hierarchy, never return objects of such types by value. Suppose you have class Base { int x; }, and class Derived : public Base { int y; }. If you do this:

Base Function() { Derived d; return d; }
...
Base b = Function();

Then b will not be a value of class Derived "hiding behind" a Base. The value b WILL be Base. The compiler will "slice off" the differences between Derived and Base, and put it into b.

In C++, you will have to use pointers or references to facilitate ad-hoc polymorphism. References in C# is pretty much the same thing as pointers in C++, with the exception that you do not have to free the objects in C#, as the garbage collector will handle this for you.

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There's nothing wrong with returning a pointer to an object. If you're worried about memory leaks, as you should be, the solution is to use smart pointers to store the returned pointer. The most flexible of these is shared_ptr from boost or the upcoming C++0x standard.

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1  
If the function returning the pointer guarantees to return a (pointer to a) new object, I'd recommend std::unique_ptr. shared_ptr can be constructed from unique_ptr. –  larsmans Apr 19 '11 at 18:57

More generally, if you're going to be doing any serious amount of work in C++, getting comfortable with pointers and memory management is kind of essential. For in-depth coverage of that and other tricky aspects of C++, I strongly recommend the Effective C++ books by Scott Meyers and the Exceptional C++ books by Herb Sutter.

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There is very easy solution to this problem. Use pointers or references for return values, but instead of returning ownership in the pointers, you should not return ownership.

For example:

class A : public Base
{
public:
   Base *correct(const I &c) 
     { p2 = do_something(c); return &p2; }
   ...
private:
   A2 p2;
};

What makes this work is that you store the p2 inside the class and never pass ownership of the objects to outside of it. The function in the interface will not create new objects, but instead it'll just return existing one, configured to correct state based on function's parameters. This is a good alternative to the unique_ptr and shared_ptr solution which relies on heap allocation and creating new objects and passing them around.

Now the nice trick with this is that you need to list all possible types you want to return from your correct() function in the data members of the class. For example, if sometimes you would return different type, it'd look like this:

class B : public Base
{
public:
   Base *correct(const I &c) {
      switch(c.get_bool()) {
         case false: p3 = do_something_else(c); return &p3;
         case true: p4 = do_something(c); return &p4;
      };
   }
 private:
    B3 p3;
    B4 p4;
};

But placing your objects p3 and p4 inside the current B object will solve this problem completely.

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