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Debugging one of my projects I noticed another developer had changed the $(document).ready() function to generate a closure inside of itself. E.G. $(document).ready(function($) { }); I am curious as to the point of doing this, as well as it's usage.

Note: By removing the $ from the function my code works again. $(document).ready(function() { })

Original/Fixed Code

$(document).ready(function() {
    var id = //pull session variable from asp session (yuck)
    var img = $('.photoLink');

    $('.photoLink').click(function() {
        $(this).photoDialog({
            id: id,
            onClose: function() {
                img.attr('src', img.attr('src') + '&rand=' + (new Date()).getTime()); //prevent caching of image
            }
        });
    });
});

Modified/Broken Code

$(document).ready(function($) {
    var id = //pull session variable from asp session (yuck)
    var img = $('.photoLink');

    $('.photoLink').click(function() {
        $(this).photoDialog({
            id: id,
            onClose: function() {
                img.attr('src', img.attr('src') + '&rand=' + (new Date()).getTime()); //prevent caching of image
            }
        });
    });
});

The modified code would produce errors in FireBug stating that the custom plugin function that I was calling did not exist. I am assuming this is because the $ argument is overriding or conflicting with any of the jQuery functions trying to use it.

I'm really confused as to why someone would have changed this, in the current context it makes no sense as that plugin call is the only javascript on the page.

Can someone explain to me why you would use this and possibly an example of it's usage?

Edit

Below is the code for my custom plugin, I also modified the examples above to display how I am calling it:

(function($) {
    var link = $('<link>');
    link.attr({
        type: 'text/css',
        rel: 'stylesheet',
        href: 'http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.7/themes/black-tie/jquery-ui.css'
    }).appendTo('head');

    var script = $('<script>');
    script.attr({
        type: 'text/javascript',
        src: 'https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.7/jquery-ui.min.js'
    }).appendTo('head');

    $.fn.photoDialog = function(options) {

        var defaults = {
            autoOpen: false,
            title: 'Photo Tool',
            minHeight: 560,
            minWidth: 540,
            url: '/photo_form.aspx',
            onClose: function(){}
        };
        var opts = $.extend(defaults, options);

        return this.each(function() {
            $this = $(this);
            that =$(this);
            var $dialog = $('<div>')
                .html('<iframe src="' + opts.url + '?sn=' + opts.id + '" width="' + (opts.minWidth - 20) + '" height="' + (opts.minHeight - 20) + '" style="border: none;" scrolling="no"></iframe>')
                .dialog({
                    autoOpen: opts.autoOpen,
                    title: opts.title,
                    minHeight: opts.minHeight,
                    minWidth: opts.minWidth,
                    modal: true,
                    close: function() {
                        opts.onClose.call(that);
                    }
                });

            $this.click(function() {
                $dialog.dialog('open');
                return false;
            });
        });
    };
})(jQuery);
share|improve this question
    
I just added a new theory to my answer ... –  Pointy Apr 19 '11 at 19:24
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you write a jQuery plugin, to support the noConflict feature, you usually do:

(function($) {
    // Plugin code...
})(jQuery);

That allows you to use $ as an alias for jQuery within the plugin code, regardless of the noConflict settings.

Maybe the other developer added the $ argument by reflex.

On second thought, strike that. The other developer was probably trying to improve the situation.

Your code should still work, even with a $ argument passed to the ready handler. You say the custom plugin function that you were calling does not exist anymore. Can you tell us more about that custom plugin?

I suspect $ is changing between the call to document.ready() and the actual execution of the handler, and you were taking advantage of that before, but you can't anymore since the original $ is now passed to the handler.

share|improve this answer
    
I added the code for my plugin. –  jon3laze Apr 19 '11 at 19:43
    
@jon3laze, well, apparently the plugin's not the culprit here. Two questions: Does jQuery(this).photoDialog() work? Do you have other scripts on the page that could do something like setting $ to $.sub()? –  Frédéric Hamidi Apr 19 '11 at 19:55
    
Oh, and your plugin code is evaluated before the call to $(document).ready(), right? –  Frédéric Hamidi Apr 19 '11 at 19:57
    
TG for NP++, searched for $ and found that he had duplicated the call in the asp...makes absolutely no sense to me but I've removed the duplication and it works. I only looked in the JS not the asp :P –  jon3laze Apr 19 '11 at 20:03
    
@jon3laze, that's why I prefer my scripts in their own files instead of inline in some other code somewhere. Glad you could solve your problem :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Apr 19 '11 at 20:09
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the first argument passed to the function inside of $(document).ready(... is the jQuery object. The pattern that you have seen only really makes sense if you had

// outside here, $ could be anything   

jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
    // $ inside here refers to jQuery
    $('.element').click(function() {
        //call custom plugin here
    });
});

This would allow the $ alias to reference jQuery inside of the function to execute when the DOM has loaded, even if window.$ does not reference jQuery but something else, like another JavaScript library function for example. But what you have in your question, so long as window.$ references jQuery, then I would expect the code to be working without problems.

share|improve this answer
    
This wasn't what the issue was but makes the most sense as far as using $. +1 –  jon3laze Apr 19 '11 at 20:04
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jQuery passes a reference to the global "jQuery" into "ready" handlers. That's why the code would be written that way, and in fact there should be no problem with it. I suspect there's more to this story than your question reveals.

edithere's a possibility: could it be that your plugin is importing a separate copy of jQuery, and that it installs itself on that one instead of yours? You might try using a tool like TamperData or the Chrome "Network" developer tool to watch all the HTTP requests and see if jQuery is being loaded twice. Alternatively, put this line before the "Broken" code:

$.banana = "yellow";

and then check inside your handler code to see whether "$" has a "banana" property or not.

If that's the case, then the difference would be that references in your "Broken" code to "$" would be references to the copy of jQuery that did not have the plugin installed. When you take the "$" parameter out, then the code can refer to the correct, updated copy of the library.

share|improve this answer
    
I am importing the jquery ui inside of the plugin, but not an additional of the base framework. I posted the code for my plugin. –  jon3laze Apr 19 '11 at 19:44
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