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I'm creating a ladder system for some games and I've encountered a problem regarding the clan base system. You see, every player who joins are parsed and put into a players table. Like this:

chelsea | gordon 
chelsea | jim
chelsea | brad

OR...

CLANTAG|> jenna
CLANTAG|> jackson
CLANTAG|> irene

So, what I want: I wanna grab the CLANTAG, which is at the same place and identical in every players name, which are on that team. But, the separator could be anything from whitespace to nothing (clan player1, clan player2 OR clanplayer1, clanplayer2).

Any ideas on how to do this?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
So the team names here are "team1", "another", and "more"? I assume the problem is that everyone used a different formatting, or is there a small number of possibilities? –  A. Rex Feb 21 '09 at 3:48
    
Please clarify this question a little - it's not clear which data you want to capture. –  Paul Beckingham Feb 21 '09 at 3:48
    
Yes; please show sample input and what you want to happen. i.e. "given {foo}{bar}, i want the array [qw/foo bar/]". Then we can help. –  jrockway Feb 21 '09 at 3:51
    
Yes, the separator varies, like I wrote in the comment below, it can be everything from whitespace to nothing. And I wanna grab the TAG, not the player name. Like with TEAMplayer1 and TEAMplayer2, I wanna grab TEAM. With tag - user, tag - user2, I wanna grab "tag". –  Frank D Feb 21 '09 at 4:10
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a shot:

use strict;
use warnings;

my($strip) = shift || 0;

print FindTeamName("TEAMJimBob", "TEAMJoeBob", "TEAMBillyBob"), "\n";
print FindTeamName("TEAM|JimBob", "TEAM|JoeBob", "TEAM|BillyBob"), "\n";
print FindTeamName("TEAM | JimBob", "TEAM | JoeBob", "TEAM | BillyBob"), "\n";
print FindTeamName("TEAMJimBob", "TEAM|JoeBob", "TEAM - BillyBob"), "\n";

sub FindTeamName
{
    my(@players) = @_;

    my($team) = shift;
    foreach my $player (@players) {
    	$team = FindCommonString($team, $player);
    }

    $team =~ s{\W+$}{} if $strip;

    $team;
}

sub FindCommonString
{
    my($str1, $str2) = @_;

    my(@arr1) = split(//, $str1);
    my(@arr2) = split(//, $str2);

    my($common) = "";

    while (@arr1 && @arr2) {
    	my($letter1) = shift(@arr1);
    	my($letter2) = shift(@arr2);

    	if ($letter1 eq $letter2) {
    		$common .= $letter1;
    	}
    	else {
    		last;
    	}
    }

    $common;
}

which gives the following:

C:\temp>perl test.pl
TEAM
TEAM|
TEAM |
TEAM

C:\temp>perl test.pl 1
TEAM
TEAM
TEAM
TEAM

C:\temp>
share|improve this answer
    
There ya go. Nice. –  Paul Beckingham Feb 21 '09 at 5:41
    
That's brilliant, thanks! =) –  Frank D Feb 21 '09 at 5:49
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Taking a wild stab here, is this what you want?

#! /usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<DATA>)
{
  if (/^(\w+) \| (\w+)$/     ||
      /^\[(\w+)\] \. (\w+)$/ ||
      /^(\w+)-(\w+)$/)
  {
    print "tag=$1, name=$2\n";
  }
}

exit 0;

__DATA__
team1 | foo
team1 | bar

[another] . user
[another] . player

more-james
more-brown

Because it generates:

tag=team1, name=foo
tag=team1, name=bar
tag=another, name=user
tag=another, name=player
tag=more, name=james
tag=more, name=brown
share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly, because the separator varies. It could be anything from whitespace to nothing at all, just like TEAMplayer1, TEAMplayer2. And I also wanna grab the TAG, not the player name. :) –  Frank D Feb 21 '09 at 4:07
    
Okay, if you're a bit more specific about the format, the answer will be closer to what you need. –  Paul Beckingham Feb 21 '09 at 4:11
    
The format? Like I said, it can be everything, the only thing we know is that it's an equal part of every team members name. –  Frank D Feb 21 '09 at 4:14
    
Ah, I see - you're looking for something on the left side that is common across multiple lines. That's a little harder... –  Paul Beckingham Feb 21 '09 at 4:15
    
Yes that's correct! But is it possible..? –  Frank D Feb 21 '09 at 4:19
show 4 more comments

Edit: re-read question and comments..

This works for the example, but may not work for names with spaces or punctuation, and possibly other scenarios:

while ( <DATA> )
{
    if ( /(\w+).*?(\w+)$/ )
    {
        print "$1, $2\n";
    }
}


__DATA__
team1 | foo
team1 | bar

[another] . user
[another] . player

more-james
more-brown

Gives:

team1, foo
team1, bar
another, user
another, player
more, james
more, brown
share|improve this answer
    
Please read my comments on the first answer.. thanks! –  Frank D Feb 21 '09 at 4:48
    
Ah, missed the no-separator case. If you have teamjones and teamjoe, then there's no way to know if the team name is "team", "teamj", "teamjo", etc. –  Chris J Feb 21 '09 at 4:58
    
That's not bad, that in fact worked on every team I had stored in the database. If we perhaps add a little fail-safe to that, it might be just what I need.. :) Thanks –  Frank D Feb 21 '09 at 5:06
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If you're just running the regex on one player's name at a time, I would suggest:

/(\w+)\W+(\w+)$/

In English, this means "at least one word character, followed by at least one non-word character, followed by at least one word character, and then the end of the line"

"Word character" is letters, numbers, and underscores. So if people ever use anything other than those characters in their tags/nicks, it'll need modification. For example, if people might also have hyphens in their nicks you'd need:

/(\w+)\W+([\w-]+)$/

As far as I know, people always use punctuation-type characters (and/or whitespace) for the separation between their clan and their nick, so the \W+ there should be fine.

As for the case you gave with no separator (clanplayer1, clanplayer2), there's no way to solve this without looking at multiple players' names that you know are in the same clan, and figuring out at which point their names start to differ, so it can't be solved with a regex alone.

share|improve this answer
    
I think he wants to derive the team name, so for "fooA" and "fooB" he wants "foo" extracted, ie longest leftmost commonality, and of course ignoring any formatting/separator junk. –  Paul Beckingham Feb 21 '09 at 5:40
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