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[I couldn't find a proper answer to this. Kindly point me to proper links if this is already answered.]

I know that it illegal to do something like this,

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void funcFoo() = 0 {}   //illegal. should be defined outside the class body
    virtual ~Base() {}
};

But this works fine on VS2008. I want to know why this is disallowed by the standard?

On android, I see that I have to define the function inline like this,

inline void Base::funcFoo() {}

instead of just,

void Base::funcFoo() {}

what is the diference in implicit inlining and explicit inlining here? what is the compiler doing different?

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What does this have to do with Android? –  CommonsWare Apr 19 '11 at 20:31
    
= 0 {} means "Pure. Not pure. Hmm... empty!" –  Andrey Apr 19 '11 at 20:37
    
@CommonsWare I think the android NDK uses some variant of gcc. I see that it does not compile if I dont put inline for the function definition. –  Vink Apr 19 '11 at 20:41
    
@Andrey: pure virtual functions can have an implementation; they just can't be called virtually, and must be overridden. The question is, why must this definition be outside the class definition, when that isn't required for other flavours of member function? –  Mike Seymour Apr 19 '11 at 20:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think there is much of an answer to this. It came up once before (possibly on Usenet instead of SO -- I don't remember), so I did some looking. I didn't really come up with much of anything. As far as I can tell, that's how Bjarne originally devised it. Although it could be changed, I couldn't find any proposals to the committee that it be changed, nor any indication that the committee has even debated, discussed, or considered it at all. My guess would be that it's considered "good enough" the way it is, so nobody's willing to put in much (any?) effort to change it.

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2  
+1 Unless someone can actually provide some sort of reasoning, I'm willing to go with this "no reason, really" type answer. –  John Dibling Apr 19 '11 at 20:48

That is ill-formed according to section §10.4/2 which says (in the note) that,

a function declaration cannot provide both a pure-specifier and a definition

[Example:

struct C {
   virtual void f() = 0 { }; // ill-formed
};

—end example]

Hope it answers your question.

Now please refer to the first comment (below) made by @John Dibling, as unfortunately the answer to your "why" question isn't in the Standard, IF "that is ill-formed" isn't an acceptable answer to you. The language grammar simply doesn't allow it.:-)

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3  
+1 This is really pretty much all there is to it, if you're asking why it's not allowed. If you're asking why the Standard authors decided to make this rule, well, that's a story for another show... –  John Dibling Apr 19 '11 at 20:39
    
@Nawaz, I am aware of section 10.4/2 I really want to know why this is disallowed. –  Vink Apr 19 '11 at 20:44
    
@Vink: Please see the edit. :-) –  Nawaz Apr 19 '11 at 20:48
2  
@Vink - There is no explicit reason, it is just not part of the language grammar. :-) The = 0 and { } don't appear in the same production. –  Bo Persson Apr 19 '11 at 20:48
2  
@Mark: this is the way to do that; but you must put the function definition outside the class definition. I've no idea why that is the case, apart from "because the standard says so". –  Mike Seymour Apr 19 '11 at 20:57

The first question is already answered -- the standard simply disallows it.

The second question is:

On android, I see that I have to define the function inline like this,

inline void Base::funcFoo() {}

instead of just,

void Base::funcFoo() {}

what is the diference in implicit inlining and explicit inlining here? what is the compiler doing different?

The difference is that the first variant can be placed in a header file, which can be included by more than one source file. The second variant must be place in exactly one source file.

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