Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently hit a problem and the only way I can see to avoid it is to use const_cast - but I'm guessing there is a way I'm not thinking of to avoid this without otherwise changing the function of the code. The code snippet below distills my problem into a very simple example.

struct Nu
{
    Nu() {v = rand();}
    int v;
};

struct G
{
    ~G()
    {
        for(auto it = _m.begin(); it != _m.end(); it++) delete it->first;
    }
    void AddNewNu()
    {
        _m[new Nu] = 0.5f;
    }
    void ModifyAllNu()
    {
        for(auto it = _m.begin(); it != _m.end(); it++) it->first->v++;
    }
    float F(const Nu *n) const
    {
        auto it = _m.find(n);
        // maybe do other stuff with it
        return it->second;
    }

    map<Nu*, float> _m;
};

Here, suppose Nu is actually a very large struct whose layout is already fixed by the need to match an external library (and thus the "float" can't simply be folded into Nu, and for various other reasons it can't be map<Nu, float>). The G struct has a map that it uses to hold all the Nu's it creates (and ultimately to delete them all on destruction). As written, the function F will not compile - it cannot cast (const Nu *n) to (Nu *n) as expected by std::map. However, the map can't be switched to map<const Nu*, float> because some non-const functions still need to modify the Nu's inside _m. Of course, I could alternatively store all these Nu*'s in an additional std::vector and then switch the map type to be const - but this introduces a vector that should be entirely unnecessary. So the only alternative I've thought of at the moment is to use const_cast inside the F function (which should be a safe const_cast) and I'm wondering if this is avoidable.

After a bit more hunting this exact same problem has already been addressed here: Calling map::find with a const argument

share|improve this question
3  
If "some non-const functions still need to modify the Nu's inside _m", Nu cannot be used as a map key. Once it's modified, map is no longer ordered. –  Cubbi Apr 19 '11 at 22:10
1  
@Joris, auto is a new feature of C++0x - maybe some compilers already support it? –  Mark Ransom Apr 19 '11 at 22:14
1  
@Joris: auto in C++0x is used to infer type of variable from its initializer. –  Xion Apr 19 '11 at 22:14
1  
There are quite a few unclear things in your question. How is your map ordered? According to the declaration you provided map<Nu*, float> _m; you are not using any custom comparator with your map, which means that your map will compare the pointer values for ordering. Is this your intent? Or are you intending to compare the actual Nu objects to establish ordering? In the latter case, there is a danger of breaking the ordering in the map every time you perform the outside modification of any Nu object. –  AndreyT Apr 19 '11 at 22:15
1  
@Matt: Why not just use composition? struct MyNu { Nu n; float f; };. Or you could even inherit, if you wanted pointer conversions. –  Puppy Apr 19 '11 at 22:32

2 Answers 2

This is because the map expects Nu* const, but you have given it a const Nu*. I also find it highly illogical and don't understand why, but this is how it is.

share|improve this answer

"find" in your case will return a const_iterator. putting:

map<Nu*,float>::const_iterator it = _m.find(n);

...

return it->second;

should work I think.

Since you are in a const method you can only read your map of course, not write/modify it

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately this won't compile either -- the return type will be inferred correctly as map<Nu*,float>::const_iterator, but .find(n) won't match the parameters because it can't cast the const Nu* to Nu*. –  Matt Fisher Apr 19 '11 at 22:23
    
Yeah you are right. Just put the code in a cpp file here to mess around with it. –  Joris Mans Apr 19 '11 at 22:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.