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I have a method like this:

protected <T> void addThing(T obj) {
    process(new Blah<T>(obj));
}

The code that is calling into this doesn't know the exact concrete class of the thing it is calling addThing() on:

Animal f = new Giraffe();
addThing(f);

So what I end up with is Blah<Animal>. But what I actually want to get is Blah<Giraffe>. Is this possible? The only solution I could get so far was kind of awkward. I end up taking the data object into Blah as an Object and downcasting it according to the template:

Blah(Object obj) {
    // Undesirable downcast.
    this.thing = (T)obj;
}

protected <T> void addThing(Class<T> clazz, Object obj) {
    process(new Blah<T>(obj));
}

Animal f = new Giraffe();
addThing(f.getClass(), f);

I guess I'm going to have to do a potentially unsafe downcast somewhere, as I don't know the subtype?

share|improve this question
    
When you pass your Giraffe object into a method via the parameter, it's a Giraffe object, as the type of the variable used to hold the object originally doesn't matter. Can you give more details on your problem and why you feel you need the kludge above? An SSCSE would help us the most. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 19 '11 at 22:51
    
The "Giraffe"-ish object came from some other piece of code. I don't know what exact subclass it is –  evilfred Apr 19 '11 at 22:52
    
@evilfred: by why even the need to cast? Perhaps it's me, but I still don't have a good feel on what your problem is. I would be helped tremendously if you told us more pertinent information. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 19 '11 at 22:54
    
The code that interacts with the Blah<T> makes use of the T class to do some reflection. It needs a concrete T instead of some parent class. –  evilfred Apr 19 '11 at 22:57
    
I guess what I want really isn't possible in Java without a downcast. –  evilfred Apr 19 '11 at 22:58
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code that interacts with the Blah makes use of the T class to do some reflection. It needs a concrete T instead of some parent class. – evilfred

No, the code can't interact with T at runtime, because it never gets to know what T is. Generics are ONLY relevant at compile time. What happens is that generics are preprocessed BEFORE the Java code is compiled into byte code. Byte code knows nothing about generics, ever.

In:

protected <T> void addThing(T obj) {
    process(new Blah<T>(obj));
}

Blah[Animal] is fixed at compile-time and you cannot turn the process method's signature into Blah[Giraffe]. Not an option.

What the code deals with at runtime is Blah[Animal], not T (or Blah< T >). Ever. What ever the subtype of what you create with new Blah< T > is, byte code will consider it as Blah[Animal]. You can't create new types at runtime.

Your idea of a solution:

Blah(Object obj) {
    // Undesirable downcast.
    this.thing = (T)obj;
}

is not going to work, because T will be resolved at compile time.

Now if you want to create Blah[Giraffe], don't delegate the creation of new Blah to the addThing method. Do something like this:

private class Blah<T> { }
private class Giraffe { }

public Test_1() {
    Blah<Giraffe> f = new Blah<Giraffe>();
    addThing2(f);
}

public <T> void addThing2(Blah<T> obj) {
    process(obj);
}

public void process(Blah<?> obj) { }

If you can't modify addThing, then you probably don't need to worry about creating a generic with an unknown subtype at runtime in the first place (because is it is impossible in Java). Your issue is/would actually be a non-problem (for the process method at least).

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I think you're right... but I thought that Class<T> could be used to capture a type at runtime. If I catch Class<T> as an argument to a method can't I construct a SomeGeneric<T> using that? –  evilfred Apr 20 '11 at 1:41
    
I guess the SomeGeneric<T> will just turn out as SomeGeneric<Object>. This is frustrating because I don't know if it's a Giraffe or a Wallaby or whatever ahead of time. But this isn't LISP I guess. I'm going to approach this from a different angle, thanks! –  evilfred Apr 20 '11 at 1:43
    
@evilfred If you have Class<T> myClass at runtime, you can call myClass.instance() or .getConstructor(...) and call the constructor. But, its type will already have been fixed at compile time. –  JVerstry Apr 20 '11 at 9:59
    
@evilfred If you have Class<Giraffe> myG or Class<Wallaby> myW in your code, you can instantiate Giraffes and Wallabys. If you need to compare types, use .getClass() or instanceOf on my Class<T> objects. Then, you can sub-type them safely to Giraffes or Wallabys. You won't get exceptions at runtime. –  JVerstry Apr 20 '11 at 10:02
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I thought generic parameter types are allowed in constructors as well?

class B<T> {
   private T thing;
   // I thought one could do generic parameter types in constructors as well?
   public B(T thing) { this.thing = thing; }
}
class C {
  public void whatever() {
    Animal f = new Giraffe();
    addThing(f);
  }
  protected <K> void addThing(K object) {
    // if you need reflection, object.getClass() will be the K type at run time.
    process(new B<K>(object));
  }

  // process method elided
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your C.addThing() constructs a B<Animal>, not a B<Giraffe>. And you can't call "new B<K.getClass()>(object)". –  evilfred Apr 19 '11 at 23:55
    
@evilfred: there is no K.getClass() anywhere. There is object.getClass() which will be class of the object at run time. Likewise there will not be a B<Animal> in that sense. At run time the actual object will be equivalent to a B<Giraffe>. You just don't know this at compile time because the Animal supertype hides this information through the various declarations. Fortunately, the return type of addThing() is void so this is not a problem. –  user268396 Apr 20 '11 at 10:38
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