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Does quoting makes any difference?

libmylib.a: ...
    $(AR) $(ARFLAGS) $@ $?
# vs
libmylib.a: ...
    "$(AR) $(ARFLAGS) $@ $?"


@echo Compiler: $(CXX)
# vs
@echo "Compiler: $(CXX)"

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The commands in makefile rules are simply fed to the shell so quoting absolutely does matter. This rule will work:

libmylib.a: ...
    $(AR) $(ARFLAGS) $@ $?

but this one won't:

libmylib.a: ...
    "$(AR) $(ARFLAGS) $@ $?"

The second won't work because you probably don't have a single command called, say, ar -r libx.a a.o b.o even though you do have an ar command that knows what to do with the -r libx.a a.o b.o argument list.

Your second example:

@echo Compiler: $(CXX)
# vs
@echo "Compiler: $(CXX)"

is a bit different because the quotes are around the argument to the shell built-in echo so these two rules:

rule1:
    @echo Compiler: $(CXX)

rule2:
    echo "Compiler: $(CXX)"

would usually produce the same output (unless, of course, you had some bizarre C++ compiler command that had, for example, a ">" in its name and, in this case, the desired output would be a smack upside the head to whoever named your C++ compiler and that's beyond the abilities of even GNU make). On the other hand, these two rules would produce slightly different output due to the interaction of the quotes and the whitespace:

rule3:
    @echo Compiler:           $(CXX)

rule4:
    echo "Compiler:           $(CXX)"

rule3 would do the same thing as rule1 but rule4 would print a string with a bunch of whitespace in the middle.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice answer. Thanks! – pic11 Apr 20 '11 at 3:28

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