Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDIT: looks like it's not possible to have only one attribute with everything inside like solution #2, so I ended up using solution #3 which is not error prone unlike solution #1.

I have an attribute as follow:

// Solution #1 (working)
[Module(Name="Module1", Guid="xxxxx",
  NeededFiles_Name = new string[]
  {
    "module1Conf.xml",
    "module1.sql",
    "resourcesWindows",
    "resourcesUnix",
  },
  NeededFiles_OS = new OSType[]
  {
    All,
    All,
    Windows,
    Unix,
  }
  NeededFiles_Component = new ComponentType[]
  {
    Server,
    Server,
    All,
    All
  }
)]

The problem is that it's not easy to fill the NeededFile_Xxx properties. It would be easier to have only one property like

// Solution #2 (NOT working)
[Module(Name="Module1", Guid="xxxxx",
  NeededFile = new FileInfo[]
  {
    new FileInfo("module1Conf.xml", All, Server),
    ...
  }
)]

but it's not allowed by the compiler (NeededFile is not a valid named attribute argument because it is not a valid attribute parameter type.

I could also divide my attribute into severals and do

// Solution #3 (working)
[Module(Name="Module1", Guid="xxxxx"]
[NeededFile("module1Conf.xml", All, Server)]
[NeededFile("module1.sql", All, Server)]
[NeededFile(...)]

but I'd rather keep everything in the same.

Is it possible to do it? Is there a better way to do it?

share|improve this question
    
I like the second option better. –  Richard Schneider Apr 20 '11 at 2:57
    
@Richard Schneider I agree. It's easier to read, much less error prone, and it even looks to take less work. –  pickypg Apr 20 '11 at 3:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why isn't it (you second option) allowed? I just tried the following:

public class MyFileInfo
{
    public MyFileInfo(string fname, string somethingElse, string anotherThing);
}

public class ModuleAttribute : System.Attribute
{
    public ModuleAttribute(string Name, string Guid, params MyFileInfo[] myFileInfoList)
    {
    }
}

[Module("Module1", "xxxx",
    new MyFileInfo("a", "b", "c"),
    new MyFileInfo("a", "d", "f"))
]
public class TestClass
{
}

And the compiler didn't complain. I think you can achieve pretty much exactly what you're trying to do.

Edit: that's what I get for letting intellisense do my compiling for me in the middle of the night after a couple beers. As you (and I) have discovered, Attribute arguments must be constants, or lists of constants - a restriction that explicitly excludes classes and structs.

I think the best you're going to be able to do is pass in a serialized version of the data you're trying to tag onto the attribute. Then the attribute constructor can do the actual object initialization at runtime. This loses compile-time checking of your initializers, but gets you a bit closer to the compactness of code you were looking for.

public class MyFileInfo
{
    string fname;
    string anotherThing;
    string somethingElse;
    public MyFileInfo(string serializedFileInfo)
    {
        string[] parts = serializedFileInfo.Split(',');
        fname = parts[0];
        anotherThing = parts[1];
        somethingElse = parts[2];
    }
    public static implicit operator MyFileInfo(string things)
    {
        return new MyFileInfo(things);
    }
}

public class ModuleAttribute : System.Attribute
{
    List<MyFileInfo> fiList;
    public ModuleAttribute(string Name, string Guid, params string[] serializedFileInfoList)
    {
        fiList = serializedFileInfoList.Select(s => new MyFileInfo(s)).ToList();
    }
}

[Module("Module1", "xxxx",
    "a,b,c",
    "d,e,f"
    )
]
public class TestClass
{
}

Really though, I think you should just handle it through a separate attribute for each file.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually for my 2nd option I thought of using a named attribute (which isn't allowed by the compiler: "xxx is not a valid named attribute argument because it is not a valid attribute parameter type"), I simply didn't thought of adding "params MyFileInfo[]" to the constructor! Thanks a lot, I knew there had to be a better way to go! –  user276648 Apr 20 '11 at 4:42
    
I just realized your solution doesn't compile on my PC! I tried on VS2008 as well as MonoDevelop with .Net 4...I just can't do a "new MyFileInfo" as it tells me "An attribute argument must be a constant expression, typeof expression or array creation expression of an attribute parameter type". Also I had to write "{}" instead of ";" for MyFileInfo (might just be a mistake on your part though). –  user276648 Apr 20 '11 at 7:49
    
Thanks for the other way to do it, but I'd rather be able to use Intellisense. As for losing the compile-time checking, it's always possible to use some unit test: that's what I use when I have a string representing a Guid, or a string representing an assembly qualified class name (useful if the class is in another assembly). So eventually I'll just go with the separate attribute for each file... –  user276648 Apr 21 '11 at 5:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.