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The command git add [--all|-A] appears to be identical to git add .. Is this correct? If not, how do they differ?

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Beware of the extra '.' you need to use for git add -A. See my answer below –  VonC Apr 23 '13 at 6:33
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4 Answers

up vote 1396 down vote accepted

"git add -A" is equivalent to "git add .; git add -u".

The important point about "git add ." is that it looks at the working tree and adds all those paths to the staged changes if they are either changed or are new and not ignored, it does not stage any 'rm' actions.

"git add -u" looks at all the currently tracked files and stages the changes to those files if they are different or if they have been removed. It does not add any new files, it only stages changes to already tracked files.

"git add -A" is a handy shortcut for doing both.

You can test the differences out with something like this:

git init
echo Change me > change-me
echo Delete me > delete-me
git add change-me delete-me
git commit -m initial

echo OK >> change-me
rm delete-me
echo Add me > add-me

git status
# Changed but not updated:
#   modified:   change-me
#   deleted:    delete-me
# Untracked files:
#   add-me

git add .
git status

# Changes to be committed:
#   new file:   add-me
#   modified:   change-me
# Changed but not updated:
#   deleted:    delete-me

git reset

git add -u
git status

# Changes to be committed:
#   modified:   change-me
#   deleted:    delete-me
# Untracked files:
#   add-me

git reset

git add -A
git status

# Changes to be committed:
#   new file:   add-me
#   modified:   change-me
#   deleted:    delete-me

Summary:

  • git add -A stages All
  • git add . stages new and modified, without deleted
  • git add -u stages modified and deleted, without new
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59  
Thanks for this detailed answer. I have edited your post adding sample output and summary. –  takeshin Sep 4 '10 at 7:02
24  
The answer was excellent. I just had to run the code to see the output, so I thought that other may save some time seeing the output without running the code. I added the summary for the output above, which uses keywords: deleted, new and modified to be clear. No offence. Feel free to roll back the changes :) –  takeshin Sep 4 '10 at 16:04
8  
Seeing the output was helpful - I'm new to git. Thanks to both of you. Most thorough and well-explained answer! –  mahalie Jun 7 '11 at 0:50
13  
How about the difference between git add *? –  Jared Mar 24 '12 at 0:52
3  
@Jared, added the asterisk explanation to answer your question –  Geo Apr 3 '13 at 21:13
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So from Charles instructions above, after testing my proposed understanding would be as follow:

# For the next commit
$ git add .   # add to index only files created/modified and not those deleted
$ git add -u  # add to index only files deleted/modified and not those created
$ git add -A  # do both operation at once, add to index all files

This link might also be helpfull to understand in what situation those commands may be applied: Removing Deleted Files from your Git Working Directory.

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Note that starting git 2.0 (Q1 or Q2 2014), when talking about git add . (current path within the working tree), you must use '.' in the other git add commands as well.

That means:

"git add -A ." is equivalent to "git add .; git add -u ."

(Note the extra '.' for git add -A and git add -u)

Because git add -A or git add -u would operate (starting git 2.0 only) on the entire working tree, and no just on the current path.

Those commands will operate on the entire tree in Git 2.0 for consistency with "git commit -a" and other commands. Because there will be no mechanism to make "git add -u" behave as if "git add -u .", it is important for those who are used to "git add -u" (without pathspec) updating the index only for paths in the current subdirectory to start training their fingers to explicitly say "git add -u ." when they mean it before Git 2.0 comes.

A warning is issued when these commands are run without a pathspec and when you have local changes outside the current directory, because the behaviour in Git 2.0 will be different from today's version in such a situation.

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good point. But it's end of the year and 2.0 is still not here :) –  dalvarezmartinez1 Dec 20 '13 at 14:10
    
@dalvarezmartinez1 right ;) I have updated the answer: probably Q1 or Q2 2014 –  VonC Dec 20 '13 at 14:34
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Late to the party but this question also deserves a more distilled quick answer.

git add -A 

Does both below (same as git add --all)

git add . 

Stages new + modified files

git add -u 

Stages modified + deleted files

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Hello, what if you just wanted to stage only modified files? How would you do that? –  TheGrapeBeyond May 26 at 16:06
    
Hello, well good question. There isn't an easy flag for that as far as i know.. git diff-files -z --diff-filter=M --name-only | xargs -0 git add from -> stackoverflow.com/questions/14368093/… –  Kilian Lindberg May 28 at 13:19
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