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I'm doing a bit of self study on functional languages (currently using Haskell). I came across a Haskell based assignment which requires defining map and filter in terms of foldr. For the life of me I'm not fully understanding how to go about this.

For example when I define a map function like:

map'            :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
map' f []       = []
map' f (x:xs)   = foldr (\x xs -> (f x):xs) [] xs

I don't know why the first element of the list is always ignored. Meaning that:

map' (*2) [1,2,3,4]

results in [4,6,8] instead of [2,4,6,8]

Similarly, my filter' function:

filter'             :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
filter' p []        = []
filter' p (x:xs)    = foldr (\x xs -> if p x then x:xs else xs ) [] xs

when run as:

filter' even [2,3,4,5,6]

results in [4,6] instead of [2,4,6]

Why would this be the case? And how SHOULD I have defined these functions to get the expected results? I'm assuming something is wrong with my lambda expressions...

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5 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

I wish I could just comment, but alas, I don't have enough karma.

The other answers are all good ones, but I think the biggest confusion seems to be stemming from your use of x and xs.

If you rewrote it as

map'            :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
map' f []       = []
map' f (x:xs)   = foldr (\y ys -> (f y):ys) [] xs

you would clearly see that x is not even mentioned on the right-hand side, so there's no way that it could be in the solution.

Cheers

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Precicely. Thus it should become clear that map' f xs instead of map' f (x:xs) should solve the problem. –  Dan Burton Apr 20 '11 at 13:12
1  
Btw GHC can be an aid in seeing it when option -Wall is used: Warning: Defined but not used: 'x' (or, for the original code: This binding for 'x' shadows the existing binding) –  Ed'ka Apr 20 '11 at 14:46
    
Now, you should have enough karma and a nice badge on top ;) –  FUZxxl Apr 20 '11 at 17:20
    
I do indeed. Thanks! –  tredontho Apr 20 '11 at 23:41
1  
Thanks, you were right... my usage of x & xs was confusing me! This really made it much clearer. –  klactose Apr 21 '11 at 2:57
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For your first question, foldr already has a case for the empty list, so you need not and should not provide a case for it in your own map.

map' f = foldr (\x xs -> f x : xs) []

The same holds for filter'

filter' p = foldr (\x xs -> if p x then x : xs else xs) []

Nothing is wrong with your lambda expressions, but there is something wrong with your definitions of filter' and map'. In the cons case (x:xs) you eat the head (x) away and then pass the tail to foldr. The foldr function can never see the first element you already ate. :)

Alse note that:

filter' p = foldr (\x xs -> if p x then x : xs else xs) []

is equivalent (η-equivalent) to:

filter' p xs = foldr (\x xs -> if p x then x : xs else xs) [] xs
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Thanks for letting me know that it is a bit redundant to add a case for the empty list. –  klactose Apr 21 '11 at 3:11
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In your definitions, you are doing pattern matching for x:xs, which means, when your argument is [1,2,3,4], x is bound to 1 and xs is bound to the rest of the list: [2,3,4].

What you should not do is simply throw away x: part. Then your foldr will be working on whole list.

So your definitions should look as follows:

map'            :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
map' f []       = []
map' f xs       = foldr (\x xs -> (f x):xs) [] xs

and

filter'             :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
filter' p []        = []
filter' p xs        = foldr (\x xs -> if p x then x:xs else xs ) [] xs
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The cases for [] are redundant --- foldr does the right thing when you pass it []. –  dave4420 Apr 20 '11 at 7:28
    
Yup. But Alessandro already wrote it. So for further improvements, check out his answer. –  x13n Apr 20 '11 at 7:39
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Your solution almost works .) The problem is that you've got two differend bindings for x in both your functions (Inside the patternmatching and inside your lambda expression), therefore you loose track of the first Element.

map'            :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
map' f []       = []
map' f (x:xs)   = foldr (\x xs -> (f x):xs) [] (x:xs)

filter'             :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
filter' p []        = []
filter' p (x:xs)    = foldr (\x xs -> if p x then x:xs else xs ) [] (x:xs)

This should to the trick :). Also: you can write your functions pointfree style easily.

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I would write map using foldr as follows:

map :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
map f = foldr ((:).f) []

And for the case of filter:

filter :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
filter p = foldr (\x xs -> if p x then x:xs else xs) []

Note that it is not necessary to pass the list itself when defining functions over lists using foldr or foldl. The problem with your solution is that you drop the head of the list and then apply the map over the list and this is why the head of the list is missing when the result is shown.

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This answers a question in the title, very neatly, but it would be even more helpful if you explained, and yet more helpful if you answered the other questions in the question. –  AndrewC Sep 27 '12 at 7:50
    
Following @coffeMug suggestion, parameters can be reduced inside lambda too: filter p = foldr (\x -> if p x then (x:) else id) [] –  paluh Dec 12 '13 at 1:47
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