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I have a class like this:

  template<class T>
  class AdjacencyList {
  public:
    void delete_node(const T&);

  protected:
    const typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator _iterator_for_node(
        const std::vector<T>&, const T&
    );
  };

  template<class T>
  void AdjacencyList<T>::delete_node(const T& node) {
    _nodes.erase(_iterator_for_node(_nodes, node));
  }

  template<class T>
  const typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator AdjacencyList<T>::_iterator_for_node(
      const std::vector<T>& list, const T& node
  ) {
    typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator iter =
        std::find(list.begin(), list.end(), node);
    if (iter != list.end())
      return iter;

    throw NoSuchNodeException();
  }

Apparently, std::vector::erase() cannot take a const_iterator, but std::find() requires one. I could cast away the const-ness of the iterator returned by std::find() when feeding it to std::vector::erase(), but Effective C++ taught me to regard const_cast with suspicion.

Is there another way to do this? I can't believe that something as common as removing an element from a vector should require type gymnastics. :)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Aside from my direct modification of the code, here's an idea:

Instead of a member function _iterator_for_node which

  • has const issues
  • is uselessly tightly bound to a particular container type (inducing a typename template resolution mess)
  • does nothing more than std::find and throw an exception if not found

I suggest creating the following static (global/namespace) function instead:

template<class It, class T>
    It checked_find(It begin, It end, const T& node)
{
    It iter = std::find(begin, end, node);
    if (iter != end)
        return iter;

    throw NoSuchNodeException();
}

It will work with any iterator type (including non-STL, input stream iterators, forward only, const, reverse iterators... you name it) and it doesn't require explicit distinction between const/non const versions :)

With it,

a working version of your code sample would just read

template<class T>
class AdjacencyList {
        std::vector<T> _nodes;
    public:
        void delete_node(const T& node) 
        { _nodes.erase(checked_find(_nodes.begin(), _nodes.end(), node)); }
};

Note the code reduction. Always the good sign

Cheers

share|improve this answer
    
Code reduction is definitely a good sign. I like this idea, especially if bound to my Graph namespace and not the global one. :) –  Josh Glover Apr 20 '11 at 9:02
    
+1 much better than the previous one. Another solution could be to provide an erase template method that is actually safe to use (directly). –  Matthieu M. Apr 20 '11 at 9:47

I suggest you change or overload your _iterator_for_node() function to accept a non-const reference to the list. The reason std::find returns a const_iterator is because the list itself is const, and therefore begin() and end() return const_iterators.

As an aside, const_cast<> won't actually convert a const_iterator to an iterator as the 'const' is just part of the name, not a CV-qualifier.

Also, you're not technically supposed to prefix names with an underscore, as this is reserved for implementations. (it will generally work in practice)

share|improve this answer
    
+3 for 3 good observations :) –  sehe Apr 20 '11 at 8:12
    
AFAIR, it's only names prefixed with an underscore and then a capital letter that are reserved for the implementation. –  Kaz Dragon Apr 20 '11 at 8:45
    
I know about the naming of the class. :) I did try changing the iterator to a const_iterator, but then I needed to cast the iterator when passing it to std::vector::erase(), and the compiler hated that without a const_cast. –  Josh Glover Apr 20 '11 at 9:00
2  
(N3291) 17.6.4.3.2 Global names [global.names] 1 Certain sets of names and function signatures are always reserved to the implementation: — Each name that contains a double underscore _ _ or begins with an underscore followed by an uppercase letter (2.12) is reserved to the implementation for any use. — Each name that begins with an underscore is reserved to the implementation for use as a name in the global namespace. –  SoapBox Apr 20 '11 at 9:07
3  
Thus, _iterator_for_node is not reserved because it is a MEMBER function (not in the global namespace) and the 2nd character is not an upper case letter or an underscore. –  SoapBox Apr 20 '11 at 9:08

There seems to be quite some confusion between const elements, and const iterators in your code.

Without looking in to the use case, I propose the following 'fix' to make things compile:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct NoSuchNodeException {};

template<class T>
class AdjacencyList {
        std::vector<T> _nodes;
    public:
        void delete_node(const T&);

    protected:
        typename std::vector<T>::iterator _iterator_for_node(std::vector<T>&, const T&);
        typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator _iterator_for_node(const std::vector<T>&, const T&) const;
};

template<class T>
void AdjacencyList<T>::delete_node(const T& node) {
    _nodes.erase(_iterator_for_node(_nodes, node));
}

template<class T>
    typename std::vector<T>::iterator AdjacencyList<T>::_iterator_for_node(std::vector<T>& list, const T& node)
{
    typename std::vector<T>::iterator iter = std::find(list.begin(), list.end(), node);
    if (iter != list.end())
        return iter;

    throw NoSuchNodeException();

}

template<class T>
    typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator AdjacencyList<T>::_iterator_for_node(const std::vector<T>& list, const T& node)  const
{
    typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator iter = std::find(list.begin(), list.end(), node);
    if (iter != list.end())
        return iter;

    throw NoSuchNodeException();
}

int main()
{
    AdjacencyList<int> test;
    test.delete_node(5);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1! There is no need to accept the vector as a reference to a const, if you use that method to modify that vector. –  Andrei Sosnin Apr 20 '11 at 8:19
    
@deemoowoor: yes, thinking in C++ requires thinking const through. See my other answer for a more versatile/less clumsy solution –  sehe Apr 20 '11 at 8:42

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