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I try to write a shell script but I have some difficulties to do a special if statement. I would like that if it find a value in a file it do something.

My file is like this: 1, 2, 2, 8
0, 0, 3, 3
5, 0, 4, 5
1, 4, 5, 3
1, 0, 8, 7
I do this to extract some information
sed -i '/^[0-9][0-9], [0-9][0-9], 3,/d' file.txt
But I would like to put this in a if condition.
like if the third number is a 3 or 4 or 5 I do the sed else I do something else I try this:

if [ '/*, *, [3,5],/d' ]; then
    echo 'ok'
else
    echo'fail'
fi

But it doesn't work, it always prints ok.

Do you know how I can do this?

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What should your script do? –  larsmans Apr 20 '11 at 9:45
    
just extract some information from the file, this part work fine. I just would like to improve my script when the numbers that I want are not inside it do something else. –  tranen Apr 20 '11 at 9:50
    
what's wrong with if [ grep -s ' 3,' $filename ]; then etc. ? This will return OK when the file contains a bare 3 followed by a comma, anywhere on the line. But it's unclear what your trying to do here anyway... Is the filename in a variable, have you read the file into an array? What is the exact condition etc. ? –  Henno Brandsma Apr 20 '11 at 9:52
    
With the grep I get this error : [grep: unexpected operator the file is just number like this >1, 2, 2, 8 >0, 0, 3, 3 >5, 0, 4, 5 >1, 4, 5, 3 >1, 0, 8, 7 I do this to extract some information sed -i '/^[0-9][0-9]*, [0-9][0-9]*, 3,/d' file.txt But I would like to put this in a if condition. like if the third number is a 3 or 4 or 5 I do the sed else I do something else –  tranen Apr 20 '11 at 10:00
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4 Answers

please provide clearer examples next time

#!/bin/bash
# tested with bash 4
while read -r x x Y x
do
  case "$Y" in
   "3," ) echo "ok";;
   *) echo "Not ok";;
  esac
done < file
share|improve this answer
    
+1. I never knew the -r option to read. –  Noufal Ibrahim Apr 20 '11 at 10:05
    
but it's only for one number? how about if I want 3-4-5? –  tranen Apr 20 '11 at 10:08
    
@tranen, then you better show some clearer examples of what you want. Specify all possible format of your input file. Without sufficient information, you won't expect to get accurate answers to your question. –  bash-o-logist Apr 20 '11 at 10:20
    
I already do it in the previous comment above –  tranen Apr 20 '11 at 10:28
    
@tranen, please edit your question to include your new information. Putting them in your question will enable solution providers to immediately know what you are looking for. Also, putting them into the comment section will lose formatting. –  bash-o-logist Apr 20 '11 at 10:31
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' *' will match an undetermined number of spaces. You should put [0-9]* instead.

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You can use Internal-Field-Separator and let the shell take care about parsing:

#!/bin/sh
# let's create the input file
echo '5, 2, 3, 5' > /tmp/myfile

# function will output third argument
third() { IFS=', '; echo $3; }

# now let's print the third value from the input file
third $(cat /tmp/myfile)

See man sh, and look for the IFS to learn more about it.

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thanks for the answer but it didn't do the if loop –  tranen Apr 21 '11 at 1:37
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If you are not forced to use shell-only solution you can get the third field by awk:

#!/bin/sh
THIRD=$(awk -F', ' '{print $3}' < /tmp/myfile)
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