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1st code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class demo
{
  int a;
public:
  demo():a(9){}
  demo& fun()//return type isdemo&
  {
    return *this;
  }
};

int main()
{
  demo obj;
  obj.fun();
  return 0;
}

2nd code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class demo
{
  int a;
public:
  demo():a(9){}
  demo fun()//return type is demo
  {
    return *this;
  }
};

int main()
{
  demo obj;
  obj.fun();
  return 0;
}

what is the difference between these two codes as both are working in gcc?i am new here so forgive me if my way of asking is wrong.

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Please read your question after submitting it and see if it is understandable - in this cas it needed formatting as all the code was hidden –  Mark Apr 20 '11 at 11:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

demo & fun() returns a reference to the current object. demo fun() returns a new object, made by copying the current object.

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you mean to say both are correct.Also i want to know is there any difference between this pointer and pointer to object of the function that invokes the function? –  Gautam Kumar Apr 20 '11 at 11:23
2  
@gautam: Both are valid, but they do different things. Whether or not they are both "correct" depends on what you want your code to do. (And as for your question, no they should be the same pointer.) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 20 '11 at 11:25
    
Both are correct (depending on what you want to do), but they don't do the same thing. this applies to the current object - in your case that's the obj from main –  Erik Apr 20 '11 at 11:25

Apart from what @Erik said about the return type, a little excursus on the this-pointer:
The following is equivalent:

struct my_struct{
  my_struct* get_this() const { return this; }
};

my_struct obj;
my_struct* obj_this = ob.get_this();

std::cout << std::boolalpha; // to display true/false instead of 1/0
std::cout << "&obj == obj_this = " << &obj == obj_this << "\n";

The this pointer is just the pointer to that object, you can think of it as a hidden parameter. It's more understandable in the C way:

typedef struct my_struct{
  int data;
  // little fidgeting to simulate member functions in c
  typedef void (*my_struct_funcptr)(struct my_struct*,int);
  my_struct_funcptr func;
}my_struct;
// C++ does something similar to pass the this-pointer of the object
void my_struct_func(my_struct* this, int n){
  this->data += n;
}

my_struct obj;
obj.data = 55;
// see comment in struct
obj.func = &my_struct_func;
obj.func(&obj, 15);
//       ^^^^ - the compiler automatically does this for you in C++
std::cout << obj.data; // displays 70
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Both are valid but are different. In the first case demo& fun() a reference to the same object is returned, in the second case a new object is created. While both are the same, the semantics differ, run this example:

#include <iostream>
struct test {
  int x;
  test() : x() {}
  test& foo() { return *this; }
  test bar() { return *this; }
  void set( int value ) { x = value; }
};
int main() {
  test t;
  t.foo().set( 10 );             // modifies t
  t.bar().set( 5 );              // modifies a copy of t
  std::cout << t.x << std::endl; // prints 10
}
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1  
It's of worth to note that this kind of design is fairly uncommon in c++. Method chaining is the term. t.foo().set(10); is the typical usage, or even longer chains t.foo().set(10).foo().set(20);. In the latter case set() needs to return *this as well. –  Captain Giraffe Apr 20 '11 at 11:41
    
@Captain Giraffe: thanks for bringing the term. I did not care to do it as I was just trying to represent the implication that returning reference/value would have when the return value is later used. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 20 '11 at 14:22

In code 1 demo obj creates a fresh copy of demo. obj is initialised using demo's default constructor 'demo():a(9){}'. obj.fun() returns a reference to (already existing) obj.

In code 2 obj.fun() creates a new demo type object using demo's copy constructor (in your case it is compiler generated) and returns that copy to the caller.

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Both code are valid.

  1. 1st code fun() is returning a reference to current object
  2. 2nd code fun() is returning the copy (by value) of the object
  3. For 1st case, If you decide to return by value then prefer to return a const reference; i.e. const demo& fun(); and later you can copy it if needed. Simply returning reference makes the object modifiable, which may accidently edit the content without intent
  4. For 2nd case, Do NOT return the object by value, because it can create unnecessary temporary copy which will effect the memory/performance of your code
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