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I wanted to sort with 'sets' or 'a'. I try with the information below .

>>> sorted(student_objects, key=attrgetter('grade', 'age'))
[('john', 'A', 15), ('dave', 'B', 10), ('jane', 'B', 12)]

http://wiki.python.org/moin/HowTo/Sorting/

That function works with 'count' but not with 'sets', 'a'.

class Number:
    def __init__(self, sets, count, a):
        self.sets = sets
        self.count = count
        self.a = a
    def __repr__(self):
        return repr((self.sets, self.count, self.a))


number_object=[([1, 3, 7], 2, 3), ([3, 7], 2, 2), ([2, 4], 2, 2), ([1, 7], 9, 2), ([1, 3], 2, 2), (7, 2, 0), (4, 2, 0), (3, 3, 0), (2, 2, 0), (1, 2, 0)]

I wanted to use the one below, but it doesn't work. I use the same way the webpage introduce.

sorted(student_objects, key=attrgetter('sets', 'count'))

Funny thing is that count can work, but not the other one.

After trying several time, I decide to use another way. I can get the same result with this instruction.

s=sorted(number_object, key=itemgetter(0), reverse=True )
sorted(s, key=itemgetter(1), reverse=True )

But I am curious why the original one doesn't work. is there anyone who is good at python??

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You are trying to use lists of different lengths as search keys. How do you expect them to be sorted in any meaningful manner? What does "it doesn't work" mean? –  Sven Marnach Apr 20 '11 at 11:30
1  
sorted(**student**_objects, key=attrgetter('sets', 'count')) ? –  vartec Apr 20 '11 at 11:30
2  
This really doesn't make much sense. Your number_object doesn't use your Number class at all. What do you expect to happen if you don't use the class you defined? –  S.Lott Apr 20 '11 at 11:31
1  
'is there anyone who is good at python?' Good question, not easy to answer. –  joaquin Apr 20 '11 at 12:02
    
The "bug" is neither trivial nor interesting. It appears that the "bug" is a failure to actually create objects of the expected class. –  S.Lott Apr 20 '11 at 12:09

1 Answer 1

If you follow the link you gave, you will realize you must instantiate your objects like this:

number_objects = [Number([1, 3, 7], 2, 3),
                  Number([3, 7], 2, 2), 
                  .......
                 ]

then,

sorted(number_objects, key=attrgetter('sets', 'count'))

should work.

For example:

from operator import attrgetter
class Number:
    def __init__(self, sets, count, a):
        self.sets = sets
        self.count = count
        self.a = a
    def __repr__(self):
        return repr((self.sets, self.count, self.a))


number_objects = [Number([1, 3, 7], 2, 3), Number([3, 7], 2, 2),
                  Number([2, 4], 2, 2), Number([1, 7], 9, 2), 
                  Number([1, 3], 2, 2)]

print sorted(number_objects, key=attrgetter('sets', 'count'))

produces:

[([1, 3], 2, 2), ([1, 3, 7], 2, 3), ([1, 7], 9, 2), ([2, 4], 2, 2), ([3, 7], 2,
2)]
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