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I've got a problem with decoding the filename of an e-mail attachment. Currently I'm using JavaMail 1.4.2. The file is named "Żółw.rtf" (that's polish for Turtle.rtf). The mail is sent using Mail.app (which seems to be quite significant). The important headers are:

--Apple-Mail-19-721116558
Content-Disposition: attachment;
   filename*=utf-8''Z%CC%87o%CC%81%C5%82w.rtf
Content-Type: text/rtf;
   x-unix-mode=0644;
   name="=?utf-8?Q?Z=CC=87o=CC=81=C5=82w=2Ertf?="
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The corresponding javax.mail.Part.getFileName() returns "=?utf-8?Q?Z=CC=87o=CC=81=C5=82w=2Ertf?=", which, after applying MimeUtility.decodeText, is: "Żółw.rtf". Clearly not the original :).

For comparison, MimeUtility.encodeText returns:

=?UTF-8?Q?=C5=BB=C3=B3=C5=82w.rtf?=

in contrast to:

=?utf-8?Q?Z=CC=87o=CC=81=C5=82w=2Ertf?=

coming from the e-mail.

According to my research, the letter "Ż" can be encoded in two ways: either as a single letter or as "Z" + above-dot. MimeUtility.encodeText uses the former, Mail.app the latter.

However I want to be able to decode both. Is there a way to decode the filename when sent from Mail.app using JavaMail? Or maybe there is some other library?

Thanks! Adam

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To answer myself, you have to normalize the string: String decoded = MimeUtility.decodeText(part.getFileName()); return Normalizer.normalize(decoded, Normalizer.Form.NFC); Weird, but works! :) –  adamw Apr 20 '11 at 14:22
1  
great that you found the solution! Could you post it as an answer? This would help people with the same problem in the future (you'd probably get upvotes as well ;-)) –  Joachim Sauer Apr 20 '11 at 14:56
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Turns out you have to normalize the string:

String decoded = MimeUtility.decodeText(part.getFileName()); 
return Normalizer.normalize(decoded, Normalizer.Form.NFC); 

Weird, but works! :) In more details, as Mail.app encodes "Ż" as two characters: "Z" + "dot-above", this then has to be recombined using the Normalizer.

Adam

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I dont know if it's useful I have a part of java coding which checks for mail file attachments and if present then save it in the specified filepath taking the name and extension specified and if the filename already exists under the path then it increments a value to the end of the filename. So here's the code snippet :

enter

Multipart mp = (Multipart)messages[i].getContent();

 for (int j=0, n=mp.getCount(); j<n; j++) {

     Part part = mp.getBodyPart(j);

       String disposition = part.getDisposition();

        if ((disposition != null) && 
                                  ((disposition.equals(Part.ATTACHMENT) || 
                                   (disposition.equals(Part.INLINE))))){                                      

       String path = "c:\\Temp;

                                    saveFile(part.getFileName(), part.getInputStream(),path);

       }
  }

  public static void saveFile(String filename,InputStream input, String path) throws IOException {
    if (filename == null) {
    filename = File.createTempFile("xx", ".out").getName();
    }

     try{
    boolean success = (new File(path)).mkdirs();
    if (success) {
      System.out.println("Directories: " + path + " created");
    }

    }catch (Exception e){//Catch exception if any
      System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
    }

    String filenamepath = path + "//"+filename;
    File file = new File(filenamepath);
    for (int i=0; file.exists(); i++) {     

         String fname="";
            String ext="";
            int mid= filenamepath.lastIndexOf(".");
            fname=filenamepath.substring(0,mid);
             ext=filenamepath.substring(mid+1,filenamepath.length());               


    file = new File(newpath);
    }
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(file);
    BufferedOutputStream bos = new BufferedOutputStream(fos);
    BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(input);
    int aByte;
    while ((aByte = bis.read()) != -1) {
    bos.write(aByte);
    }
    bos.flush();
    bos.close();
    bis.close();
    System.out.println("File saved to :"+file+"*******");
    }

here

Hope you find it useful.

Regards, Rajeev

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but the problem lies in part.getFileName(): this may return e.g. =?utf-8?Q?Z=CC=87o=CC=81=C5=82w=2Ertf?=, if the filename contains non-ASCII characters. And this must be decoded :). –  adamw Apr 20 '11 at 12:38
    
0 down vote hi, dont know if this link provides you with any clues.The code does have a sample of decoding a text properly.According to them there are some cases where JavaMail is not able to fetch multi-encoded words or broken which is caused by some mailers which are not mime compliant and have provided a sample to decode such texts. szszi.hu/~pts/oxinstall/… I hope it works for you. Regards, Rajeev –  user716775 Apr 20 '11 at 14:51
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