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From my previous discussions here i took away the fact that files are secure if you put them under the root. I spoke with the person who handles this for me, he says if we block public access, then users who uploaded their content can't download or view their files. to give you an example of what i am trying to do:

If i, a member of the site upload to my account a word file, then i should be able to come back and download it. But because the folder is blocking access, how can the file then be downloaded?

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1  
If you mean above the webroot, then yes they are "secure" because they cannot be addressed by an end-user. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 20 '11 at 12:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally, files that you want to be downloadable should be inside the document root or somewhere deeper inside it. But, if you only want to make files downloadable some of the time (e.g. you want to check user credetials first, or count downloads in a database), you can write a download script. The simplest form would be something like:

<?php
header('Content-Disposition: attachment;filename=hello.txt');
readfile('/path/to/file.txt');
?>

Note that there's an even better way using a special Apache module called xsendfile. With that, you could do something like this:

<?php
header('Content-Disposition: attachment;filename=hello.txt');
header('X-Sendfile: /path/to/file.txt');
?>

Apache will see the second header, strip it and send the contents of file.txt. The nice thing is that your resource intensive PHP script will already have stopped and you won't be running into any kind of PHP time or memory limits.

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+1 For the good and complete writeup (using mod_xsendfile is indeed a nice solution for apache). You should note however that the first approach probably won't work on hosting with open_basedir restrictions in effect... –  wimvds Apr 20 '11 at 12:11
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@wimvds: On almost all shared hosting with open_basedir restrictions the restricted directory is actually one directory above the public document root. In that case it will usually work (since the user is unable to upload files anywhere outside the directory specified in open_basedir). In AAA's case it's pretty much guaranteed to work. His upload script is a PHP script. Anywhere PHP can write a file, readfile will be able to read it because both use the same open_basedir. –  Sander Marechal Apr 20 '11 at 12:24
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@AAA: You will need to do that manually with PHP as well. For example, by processing the output of glob. –  Sander Marechal Apr 20 '11 at 13:11
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@Sander: I've seen some hosters set open_basedir to . in my time, but you're of course right that it will work when it's configured correctly and it will indeed surely work if he's able to write to that location. –  wimvds Apr 20 '11 at 13:18
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@wimvds: Ouch. An open_basedir of . is quite, eh... evil. I'd immediately move to a different hoster if I encountered that :-) –  Sander Marechal Apr 20 '11 at 13:47

Obliviously files you want to make downloadable should be stored in the root or "after". Usually files you don't want others to access directly should be stored "under" the root. That's because if you need those files just to be included you can easily go back to the root and get them with an include() or a require(), while they are hidden by the user since your address will appear as www.site.com/index.php.

Files that have to be public and requires public access (for example: download) cannot be stored "under" the root.

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please elaborte, what do you mean in the root or after? i am new please explain. thanks –  AAA Apr 20 '11 at 11:59
    
Or linked to with a symlink and then tell apache to follow sym links –  Rudie Apr 20 '11 at 11:59
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@AAA updated... –  Jefffrey Apr 20 '11 at 12:00

You can pass files to user directly right from PHP script. You need fpassthru function. But this solution is not perfect and leads to problems. I'd better prefer make you files that should be downloadable to put somewhere in publicly accessed directory (somewhere in document root directory or subdirectory). Or you can serve them from subdomain (even better).

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