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In a webapplication a handler typically consists of a function taking a Request and return a Response:

val handler:Request=>Response

What would the the "most pure" functional approach if handler takes some parameters from the Requests, changes some shared mutable state (for example a database), and then return a Response?

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Are you interested in a Haskell or Scala solution? Please edit your question… –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Apr 20 '11 at 12:36
    
Added "haskell" tag, since the text explicitly asks for a Haskell solution. –  Rex Kerr Apr 20 '11 at 16:21
    
@Jean-Philippe: You are right, i will edit the question. –  Atle Apr 20 '11 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's no such thing as "most pure", either the function performs side effects or not (you can discriminate between types of side effects, but that's another topic). So, if you need state in a pure function the only way is to pass the "before" state as parameter and return the "after" state, for example:

val handler : Request => State => (Response, State)

This is similar to the IO monad in Haskell. It can be defined like this in Scala:

type IO[A] = State => (A, State)

So the above can be written more tersely as:

val handler : Request => IO[Response]

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This blog posting from Bartosz Milewski demonstrates how to use and combine functions like handler that operate on State. He uses Haskell for his examples but it is nevertheless worth a read for Scala programmers. –  Frank S. Thomas Apr 20 '11 at 14:14
    
I guess this means that if i want to base my application on servlets, i have to build a layer that handles the mutation of state. –  Atle Apr 21 '11 at 7:27

What would the the "most pure" functional approach if handler takes some parameters from the Requests, changes some shared mutable state (for example a database), and then return a Response? How would this be done in Haskell?

It would be handled monadically, e.g.

handler :: Request -> Web Response

the type indicates the handler will receive a Request value, and do some action in a Web computational environment (containing things like the shared database), before returning a Response.

If you squint, you can actually see such a model in a production Haskell web server, snap. The effects all occur in the Snap monad.


Edit: I see you changed your question to not include a Haskell answer. Nonetheless, there is a rich amount of working on designing good web systems in Haskell. Looking at Snap or Yesod is a place to start.

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