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so i took the codility interview test yesterday and was informed today that i failed, unfortunately i wasnt given any other information by either codility nor the employer as to where i screwed up so i would appreciate some help in knowing where i went wrong. i know codility pays alot of emphasis on how fast the program runs and how it behaves for large numbers. now i didnt copy paste the questions so this the approx of what i remember

  1. count the number of elements in an array a which are absolute distinct, what it means is if an array had -3 and 3 in it these numbers are not distinct because|-3|=|3|. i think an example would clear it up better

a={-5,-3,0,1,-3} the result would be 4 because there are 4 absolute distinct elements in this array.

The question also stated that a.length would be <=10000, and most importantly it stated that assume that the array is sorted in ascending order but i didnt really understand why we would need it to be sorted

IF YOU THINK I MISSED SOMETHING ASK AND I WILL TRY TO CLEAR UP THE QUESTION FURTHER.

here is my code

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;


public class test2 {

    int test(int[] a){
        Set<Integer> s=new HashSet<Integer>();

        for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++){
            s.add(Math.abs(a[i]));

        }
        return s.size();

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        test2 t=new test2();
        int[] a={1,1,1,2,-1};
        System.out.println(t.test(a));

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
if a={-5,-3,0,1,-3} = 4 then a={-5,-5,-6,-6,-6} = 0 or 1? if 0 then ' a={-5,-3,0,1,-3}' should return 3 –  ses Jan 30 '13 at 19:48
1  
why {-5,-5,-6,-6,-6} = 0 or even 1. It is 2 -> |-5| = 5 and |-6| = 6 –  alex Jan 31 '13 at 21:10

25 Answers 25

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the array is sorted you can find duplicates by looking a neightbours. To compare absolute values to need to start at both the start and the end. This avoid creating a new structure.

EDIT: IMHO HashMap/HashSet is O(log(log(n)) due to collisions, it is only O(1) if there is a perfect hash function. I would have thought not creating object which be much much faster but appears to be only 4x fast on my machine.

In summary, you can see that using a Set is simpler, clearer and easier to maintain. It is still very fast and would be the best solution in 98% of cases.

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    for (int len : new int[]{100 * 1000 * 1000, 10 * 1000 * 1000, 1000 * 1000, 100 * 1000, 10 * 1000, 1000}) {
        int[] nums = new int[len];
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            nums[i] = (int) (Math.random() * (Math.random() * 2001 - 1000));
        Arrays.sort(nums);

        long timeArray = 0;
        long timeSet = 0;
        int runs = len > 1000 * 1000 ? 10 : len >= 100 * 1000 ? 100 : 1000;
        for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++) {
            long time1 = System.nanoTime();
            int count = countDistinct(nums);
            long time2 = System.nanoTime();
            int count2 = countDistinctUsingSet(nums);
            long time3 = System.nanoTime();
            timeArray += time2 - time1;
            timeSet += time3 - time2;
            assert count == count2;
        }
        System.out.printf("For %,d numbers, using an array took %,d us on average, using a Set took %,d us on average, ratio=%.1f%n",
                len, timeArray / 1000 / runs, timeSet / 1000 / runs, 1.0 * timeSet / timeArray);
    }
}

private static int countDistinct(int[] nums) {
    int lastLeft = Math.abs(nums[0]);
    int lastRight = Math.abs(nums[nums.length - 1]);
    int count = 0;
    for (int a = 1, b = nums.length - 2; a <= b;) {
        int left = Math.abs(nums[a]);
        int right = Math.abs(nums[b]);
        if (left == lastLeft) {
            a++;
            lastLeft = left;
        } else if (right == lastRight) {
            b--;
            lastRight = right;
        } else if (lastLeft == lastRight) {
            a++;
            b--;
            lastLeft = left;
            lastRight = right;
            count++;
        } else if (lastLeft > lastRight) {
            count++;
            a++;
            lastLeft = left;
        } else {
            count++;
            b--;
            lastRight = right;
        }
    }
    count += (lastLeft == lastRight ? 1 : 2);
    return count;
}

private static int countDistinctUsingSet(int[] nums) {
    Set<Integer> s = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for (int n : nums)
        s.add(Math.abs(n));
    int count = s.size();
    return count;
}

prints

For 100,000,000 numbers, using an array took 279,623 us on average, using a Set took 1,270,029 us on average, ratio=4.5

For 10,000,000 numbers, using an array took 28,525 us on average, using a Set took 126,591 us on average, ratio=4.4

For 1,000,000 numbers, using an array took 2,846 us on average, using a Set took 12,131 us on average, ratio=4.3

For 100,000 numbers, using an array took 297 us on average, using a Set took 1,239 us on average, ratio=4.2

For 10,000 numbers, using an array took 42 us on average, using a Set took 156 us on average, ratio=3.7

For 1,000 numbers, using an array took 8 us on average, using a Set took 30 us on average, ratio=3.6


On @Kevin K's point, even Integer can have collision even through it's hash values are unique, it can map to the same bucket as the capacity is limited.

public static int hash(int h) {
    // This function ensures that hashCodes that differ only by
    // constant multiples at each bit position have a bounded
    // number of collisions (approximately 8 at default load factor).
    h ^= (h >>> 20) ^ (h >>> 12);
    return h ^ (h >>> 7) ^ (h >>> 4);
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>(32, 2.0f);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000 && map.size() < 32 * 2; i++) {
        if (hash(i) % 32 == 0)
            map.put(i, i);
    }
    System.out.println(map.keySet());
}

prints

[2032, 2002, 1972, 1942, 1913, 1883, 1853, 1823, 1763, 1729, 1703, 1669, 1642, 1608, 1582, 1548, 1524, 1494, 1456, 1426, 1405, 1375, 1337, 1307, 1255, 1221, 1187, 1153, 1134, 1100, 1066, 1032, 1016, 986, 956, 926, 881, 851, 821, 791, 747, 713, 687, 653, 610, 576, 550, 516, 508, 478, 440, 410, 373, 343, 305, 275, 239, 205, 171, 137, 102, 68, 34, 0]

The values are in reverse order because the HashMap has generated into a LinkedList.

share|improve this answer
    
but even though i created a new structure i am still taking the same amount of time to solve the problem –  yahh Apr 20 '11 at 12:43
    
It may appear to be the same amount of time, but if you measure it for a large array of up to 10,000 entries you will find there is a very big relative difference. However, you are right that a simple solution is often the best and fast enough. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 20 '11 at 12:45
4  
@stephen: insertion and lookup are both O(1) for HashSet. –  Buhb Apr 20 '11 at 12:54
1  
@peter: I meant at least twice. –  Buhb Apr 20 '11 at 12:56
1  
d'oh, I forgot about that! There are no hash code collisions, but of course the map only has a limited number of buckets :) Thanks for taking the time to answer, and sorry for the added confusion! –  Kevin K Jul 25 '13 at 19:23

You should have pay attention to the fact that the array is sorted in ascending order.

Lets assume that there are only positive numbers, or the question was not about absolute distinct.

The you could count the Number by iterating trough the list, and increment the counter by one, if the actual element is different from the last. (and +1 for the first element)

If you understand that, you can add the absolute distinct constraint. For example by improving the algorithm by two pointers, one starting from the begin, one from the end. Then you have also to take care that both pointers works like in parallel, so that both pointers will end at 0 or the absoulte lowest number (positive/negative) - This will complicate the whole stuff a bit, but it is possible.

share|improve this answer
    
i do understand the fact that my algorithm would waste space but it would take the same amount of time to solve. the website codility doesnt really bother much with space more with running time –  yahh Apr 20 '11 at 12:48
1  
@yahh Well I think in an interview what really counts is the BEST way of doing it. This means in terms of space and memory. Ralphs method with two pointers runs in O(n) and takes O(1) memory. That is the best you can do. So this is obviously the correct answer. I suppose only the perfect answer gives the points. –  Christian Apr 20 '11 at 12:59
1  
by the way: What I learned from those interviews / tests is that an error in the code is no problem. If your code does not compile that's not as interesting as the algorithm / idea behind! In most interviews you write code on a piece of paper, where normally even the best programmers do make syntax errors etc. –  Christian Apr 20 '11 at 13:01
1  
yahh: your code us actually slower. java.util.HashSet has constant time add() only if hash function is perfect and no conflicts occurs. It's O(bucket length) otherwise, so in worst case you have O(n^2) performance. –  blaze Apr 20 '11 at 14:16
    
@blaze: shouldnt i assume that when using the hash function for primitives it would work perfectly. –  yahh Apr 20 '11 at 16:04

Here is a simple solution for this.

public class test{

public static int dis(Integer[] arr) {
    out.println(Arrays.asList(arr));
    if (arr.length == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    int i = 0;
    int j = arr.length - 1;
    int c = 0;
    while (i <= j) {
        if ((j != arr.length - 1) && (Math.abs(arr[j]) == Math.abs(arr[j + 1]))) {
            out.println("skipping J==" + j);
            j--; continue;
        }
        if ((i != 0) && (Math.abs(arr[i]) == Math.abs(arr[i - 1]))) {
            out.println("skipping I==" + i);
            i++; continue;
        }
        if (Math.abs(arr[i]) < Math.abs(arr[j])) {
            j--;
            c++;
        }
        else if (Math.abs(arr[i]) > Math.abs(arr[j])) {
            i++; c++;
        }
        else {
            i++; j--; c++;
        }

        out.println("I=" + i + " J=" + j + " C=" + c);
    }
    return c;
}




public static void main(String[] arg){

//Integer[] a = {34,2,3,4,3,-2,3};
//out.println("distinct elements are" + dis(a));
Integer[] aa={-5,-3,0,1,3};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(aa));
Integer[] ab={-5,-3,0,1,3, 4, 6, 7};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(ab));
Integer[] ac={-5};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(ac));
Integer[] acc={9};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(acc));
Integer[] ad={9,9,9};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(ad));
Integer[] ae={-5,-5};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(ae));
Integer[] aee={1,5,5,5,5};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(aee));
Integer[] af={-9, -6, -5, -5, -5, -5, -3, -3, 0, 0, 1, 5, 6, 7, 7, 8};
out.println("distinct elements count " + dis(af));

}

}

out put is

[-5, -3, 0, 1, 3]
distinct elements count 4
[-5, -3, 0, 1, 3, 4, 6, 7]
distinct elements count 7
[-5]
distinct elements count 1
[9]
distinct elements count 1
[9, 9, 9]
distinct elements count 1
[-5, -5]
distinct elements count 1
[1, 5, 5, 5, 5]
distinct elements count 2
[-9, -6, -5, -5, -5, -5, -3, -3, 0, 0, 1, 5, 6, 7, 7, 8]
distinct elements count 8
share|improve this answer

here is a python proposal i just did to practice:

def abs_distinct(A):
    if not A:
        return -1
    #assume A is sorted
    n = len(A)
    left_cursor = 0
    right_cursor = n-1
    left_value = A[0]
    right_value = A[n-1]
    nb_abs_distinct = len(set([abs(left_value),abs(right_value)]))

    while left_value != right_value:
        # case 1: decrease right_cursor down to the next different value
        if abs(left_value) < abs(right_value):
            while A[right_cursor] == right_value:
                right_cursor -= 1
            right_value = A[right_cursor]
            if abs(right_value) != abs(left_value):
                nb_abs_distinct += 1
        # case 2: increase left_cursor to the next different value
        elif abs(left_value) > abs(right_value):
            while A[left_cursor] == left_value:
                left_cursor += 1
            left_value = A[left_cursor]
            if abs(left_value) != abs(right_value): 
                nb_abs_distinct += 1

        else:
            while abs(left_value) == abs(right_value):
                left_cursor += 1
                left_value = A[left_cursor]
            nb_abs_distinct += 1

    return nb_abs_distinct
share|improve this answer
int count(vector<int> &A) {

    int len = B.size();
    if (len <= 0)
        return 0;

    // make a copy and calc absolutes of all items
    vector<int> B = vector<int>(A);
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if (B[i] < 0) 
        B[i] = -B[i];
    }

    // and sort so we have a simple absolute count
    sort(B.begin(), B.end());

    int result = 1; //count first number always
    for (int j = 1; j < len; j++) {
        if (B[j] != B[j-1])
            result++;
    }
    return result;

}
share|improve this answer

this is what i came up with, not sure if the fact that it contains a for loop inside the while deems it as typical noobie mistake.

    private int getDistict(int[] myaa) {
        int dupcount=0;
        int i = 0;
        int j = myaa.length - 1;
        while (i < j) {
    //      check neighbors 
            if(Math.abs(myaa[i]) == Math.abs(myaa[i+1])) {
                dupcount++;
                i++;
                continue;
            }
//      check the other side
            if(myaa[i] < 0) {
                for(int k = j; Math.abs(myaa[i]) <= Math.abs(myaa[k]); k-- ) {
                    if(Math.abs(myaa[i])==Math.abs(myaa[k])){
                        dupcount++;
                    }
                }               
            }
            i++;
        }
        return myaa.length - dupcount;
    }
share|improve this answer

Heres what I coded.....Let me know if it can be improved....

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.HashSet;

/********
Joel 
Jun 19, 2013
 ********/

public class CodilityTest {

    private int[] inputArray;
    public static int count=0;

    public void setInput(int [] givenIP){
        this.inputArray= new int[givenIP.length];
        for(int i=0; i<givenIP.length;i++)
        { inputArray[i] = givenIP[i];}
    }

    public int[] getInput(){
        return this.inputArray;
    }

    public CodilityTest(){
        count=0;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        CodilityTest o_tc = new CodilityTest();

        int [] x = {1,2,-3,4,-5,-11,-2,3,-4,5};
        int [] y = new int[0];
        o_tc.setInput(x);
        o_tc.getOutput(x);
        System.out.println(count);

        CodilityTest o_tc1 = new CodilityTest();
        o_tc1.getOutput(y);     
    }

    public void getOutput(int [] givenInput)
    {
        if(givenInput == null)
        {System.out.println("Please Enter some variables Sir."); return;}

        if(givenInput.length<1)
        {System.out.println("Please Enter some variables Sir."); return; }

        if(givenInput.length < 2)
        {count+=1; return;}

        HashSet<Integer> o_hs = new HashSet<Integer>();
        for(int numCount=0; numCount<givenInput.length;numCount++)
        {           
            if(o_hs.add(Math.abs(givenInput[numCount])))
            {count+=1;}
        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your solution is at least one of the easiest way to do it (more readable, easier to maintain). It surely is not the most efficient one (neither the worst) and should be acceptable if not used in a time critical code.

But you should have mentioned that and suggested that there is a more efficient solution like traversing the list from both ends (as already answered). Maybe you would have got an extra point for discussing the advantages of both solution.

Tested your solution (on old (slow) laptop):

  • less than 2 milliseconds for 10000 numbers
  • ~450 ms for 1000000
share|improve this answer

Please find below implementation which is even much faster than Peter's.

if (A == null || A.length == 0) {
  return 0;
} else if (A.length == 1 || A[0] == A[A.length - 1]) {
  return 1;
}

int absDistinct = 0;
int leftCurrent;
int leftNext;
int rightCurrent;
int rightPrevious;

for (int i = 0, j = A.length; i < j; ) {

  leftCurrent = A[i];
  rightCurrent = A[j];
  leftNext = A[i + 1];
  rightPrevious = A[j - 1];

  if (leftCurrent + rightCurrent == 0) {
    while (A[i] - A[i + 1] == 0) {
      i++;
    }
    while (A[j] - A[j - 1] == 0) {
      j--;
    }
    i++;
    j--;
    absDistinct++;
  } else {
    if (leftCurrent + rightCurrent < 0) {
      if (leftCurrent - leftNext != 0) {
        absDistinct++;
      }
      i++;
    } else {
      if (rightCurrent - rightPrevious != 0) {
        absDistinct++;
      }
      j--;
    }
  }
}

return absDistinct;

The distribution of numbers is important. But if there will be lot of series of the same numbers this algo will perform better. This shows that the algorythms complexity is not the only barier to overcome. When you have the algo with the propper complexity this might be just one of the options. Linear correction of the algo is still possible. The character of input is sometimes also important.

share|improve this answer
class Program
{
    static int CountArray(int[] MyIntArray)
    {
        int countNum = 0;
        int[] TempIntArray = new int[MyIntArray.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < MyIntArray.Length; i++)
        {
            TempIntArray[i] = Math.Abs(MyIntArray[i]);
        }
        var queryResults = from n in TempIntArray 
                           select n;
        countNum = queryResults.Distinct().ToArray().Length;
        return countNum;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("demoX6FVFB-KX8");
        Random randomNumber = new Random();
        int[] TheArray = new int[100];
        for (int j = 0; j < TheArray.Length; j++)
        {
            TheArray[j] = randomNumber.Next(-50, 50);
        }
        int counta = Program.CountArray(TheArray);
        Console.WriteLine(counta);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This is my version. What do you think?

int count(vector<int> testVector){

  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < testVector.size(); i++){
    // empty array, return 0
    if(testVector.empty()) return 0;

    // one number left, must be unique, return 1;
    if(testVector.size() == 1) return 1;

    // neighbour elements are the same, delete first element
    if(testVector[0] == testVector[1]) {
        testVector.erase(testVector.begin());
        return count(testVector);
    }

    // absolute value of first and last element identical, delete first element
    if(abs(testVector[0]) == abs(testVector[testVector.size() - 1])){
        testVector.erase(testVector.begin());
        return count(testVector);
    }

    // if absolute value of beginning is greater than absolute value of end, delete beginning, otherwise end
    if(abs(testVector[0]) > abs(testVector[testVector.size() - 1])){
        testVector.erase(testVector.begin());
    } else {
        testVector.erase(testVector.end() - 1);
    }       
    // increase counter and recurse
    return 1 + count(testVector);
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a recursive algorithm that will return the absolute unique entries in a list in a single pass, that is in O(n) time. It relies on the fact that the array is sorted and it is not using a java.util.Set.

Consider this example array {-5,-5,-3,0,1,3}

  • Because the array is sorted, one of the two elements at either end of the array will have the absolute highest value: -5
  • Again because the array is sorted, if that element is going to have a match, it will be its neighbour, or neighbours for multiple matches.
  • So for -5 we do a single check with its neighbour: they are equal. -5 is a duplicate, so remove it, don't increase our running total and recurse.

{-5,-3,0,1,3} Now we pick -5, its unique therefore increase running total to 1 and then remove it.

{-3,0,1,3} If they two ends have equal absolute values, just remove one, it doesnt matter which, just so long as its just one. Say the first. We don't increment our running total because the value we removed was a duplicate.

{0,1,3} Now we pick 3, its unique, running total goes to 2.

{0,1} Pick 1, its unique, running total 3.

{0} Size is 1, the value is unique, increment running total and return it. 4 Correct!

package com.codility.tests;

import java.util.ArrayList; 
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

public class AbsDistinct {

/**
 * Count the number of absolute distinct elements in an array.
 * The array is sorted in ascending order.
 */
private static int countAbsDistinct(List<Integer> list, int count) {
    int lastIndex = list.size() - 1;
    if (lastIndex == -1) { // zero size list, terminate
        return 0;
    }
    if (lastIndex == 0) { // one element list, terminate
        return ++count;
    }
    if (Math.abs(list.get(0)) == Math.abs(list.get(lastIndex))) {
        // doesn't matter which end is removed, but to remove _only_ 1
        list.remove(0);
    } else if (Math.abs(list.get(0)) > Math.abs(list.get(lastIndex))) {
        // if different to its nighbour, its unique hence count it
        if (list.get(0) != list.get(1)) {
            count++;
        }
        // now that its been accounted for, remove it
        list.remove(0);
    } else {
        // same logic but for the other end of the list
        if (list.get(lastIndex) != list.get(lastIndex - 1)) {
            count++;
        }
        list.remove(lastIndex);
    }
    return countAbsDistinct(list, count);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    if (args.length == 0) { // just run the tests
        List<Integer> testList = new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(-9, -6, -5, -5, -5, -5, -3, -3, 0, 0, 1, 5, 6, 7, 7, 8));
        List<Integer> empty = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        List<Integer> singleElement = new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(1));
        List<Integer> sameElement = new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1));
        System.out.println("test array: " + countAbsDistinct(testList, 0));
        System.out.println("empty array: " + countAbsDistinct(empty, 0));
        System.out.println("single element array: " + countAbsDistinct(singleElement, 0));
        System.out.println("same element array: " + countAbsDistinct(sameElement, 0));
    } else {
        List<String> argStringList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(args));
        List<Integer> argList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        for (String s : argStringList) {
            argList.add(Integer.parseInt(s));
        }
        System.out.println("argument array: " + countAbsDistinct(argList, 0));
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
import java.util.Arrays;

public class DistinctNumbers {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

       int[][] tests = new int[][] {
                                 {-5,-3, 0, 1, 3},    //4
                                 {-5,-5,-5,-5,-5},   // 1
                                 { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5},   // 5
                                 { 1},               // 1
                                 { 1, 2},            // 2
                                 { 1, 1},            // 1
                        };

       for (int[] test : tests) {
           int count = findDistinctNumberCount( test );
           System.out.println(count);
       }

    }

    static int findDistinctNumberCount(int[] numbers) {

        // 1. make everything abs.
        for (int i=0; i<numbers.length; i++) {
          if (numbers[i] <0) {
              numbers[i] = Math.abs(numbers[i]);
          }
        }

        // 2. sort them
        Arrays.sort(numbers);

        // 3. find
        int count = numbers.length;

        for (int i=0; i<numbers.length; i++) {

            // skip if not distinct (equal)
            i = skipIfNeededAndGentNextIndex(i, numbers);

        }

        return count;

    }

    public static int skipIfNeededAndGentNextIndex(int currentIndex, int[] numbers) {

        int count = numbers.length;

        int nextIndex = currentIndex;

        if ( (nextIndex + 1) != numbers.length)  {

            nextIndex += 1;

            while(numbers[currentIndex] == numbers[nextIndex]) {

                count -= 1;

                if ( (nextIndex + 1) != numbers.length) {
                    nextIndex += 1;
                } else {
                    break;
                }

            }

        }

        return count;
    }

}
share|improve this answer

.NET C#:

static int absoluteDistinctNumbers(int[] arr)
{
    int same = 0;
    int l = 0;
    int r = arr.Length - 1;

    while (l < r)
    {
        if (Math.Abs(arr[l]) == Math.Abs(arr[r]))
            ++same;

        if (Math.Abs(arr[l]) > Math.Abs(arr[r]))
            ++l;
        else
            --r;
    }

    return arr.Length - same; 
}

Is there a problem with this solution? It looks much simpler than the other ones presented...and it took me like 10 minutes, so I am quite sure I did something wrong, but I have no idea what... My tests:

var arr = new int[] { 4, 2, 1, 1, -1, -5 };
var result = absoluteDistinctNumbers(arr);
Debug.Assert(4 == result);

arr = new int[] { 1, -1 };
result = absoluteDistinctNumbers(arr);
Debug.Assert(1 == result);

arr = new int[] { };
result = absoluteDistinctNumbers(arr);
Debug.Assert(0 == result);

arr = new int[] { 2 };
result = absoluteDistinctNumbers(arr);
Debug.Assert(1 == result);

arr = new int[] { 3, 3, -3 };
result = absoluteDistinctNumbers(arr);
Debug.Assert(1 == result);

arr = new int[] { 2, 0, 0, 0 };
result = absoluteDistinctNumbers(arr);
Debug.Assert(2 == result);
share|improve this answer

Shortest version here for time complexity O(n) and O(1) memory:

int countAbsDistinct(int[] A) {
    int start = 0;
    int end = A.length - 1;
    if (end == -1) { // zero size list
        return 0;
    }

    int c = 1; // at least one abs distinct for non-empty array
    while(A[start]<A[end]){
        int l = Math.abs(A[start]);
        int r = Math.abs(A[end]);
    c++;

        if (r>=l){
            while(A[end]==list.get(--end)); // move left until different value
        }
        if (l>=r){
            while(A[start]==list.get(++start)); // move right until different value
        }
    }
    if(start>end){ // if last movements made start index bigger than end
        c--;
    }
    return c;
}
share|improve this answer

In the case of Java, Arrays.sort() method has the best average performance. The expectation of time complexity is said to be O(N*log2N). So why not use it?

Here is a solution.

  1. Go through the array, turn all the negative numbers into their absolute numbers. For example, from {-5, -3, 0, 1, 3} to {5, 3, 0, 1, 3}.
  2. User Arrays.sort() to resort the array. For example, from {5, 3, 0, 1, 3} to {0, 1, 3, 3, 5}.
  3. Go through the array again, if the neighbors do not have the same value, count up.

Here is the source in Java.

int countDistinct(int[] A) {

    int size = A.length;
    if(size == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        if(A[i] < 0) {
            A[i] = (-1) * A[i];
        }
    }

    Arrays.sort(A);

    int count = 1;
    for(int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++) {
        if(A[i] != A[i + 1]) {
            count++;
        } 
    }

    return count;
}
share|improve this answer
def solution1(A):
    indneg = -1
    lena = len(A)
    lneg = list()
    lpos = list()

    for i in range(lena-1):
        if A[i] != A[i+1]:
            if A[i] < 0:
                lneg.append(A[i])
            else:
                lpos.append(A[i])
    print(lneg)
    print(lpos)

    deltalen = 0

    for i in lneg:
        if -i in lpos: deltalen +=1

    return(len(lneg)+len(lpos)-deltalen)
share|improve this answer

This is fast solution based on binary search

import java.util.Arrays;

public class AbsoluteDistinct {

    private int absoluteDistinct(int[] a) {

        if (a.length == 0) return 0;
        if (a.length == 1) return 1;

        Arrays.sort(a);

        int dist = 1;
        int N = a.length;
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
            if (i + 1 == N) break;
            int temp = Math.abs(a[i]);
            if (temp == Math.abs(a[i+1])) continue;
            if (Arrays.binarySearch(a, (i + 1), N, temp) < 0) dist++;
        }
        return dist;
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //generate array of 1 Million random values
        int LIMIT = 1000000;
        int[] a = new int[LIMIT];
        for (int i = 0; i < LIMIT; i++) {
            int r = (int) (Math.random() * (LIMIT + LIMIT + 1)) - LIMIT;
            a[i] = r;
        }
        //print absolute distinct numbers 
        System.out.println(new AbsoluteDistinct().absoluteDistinct(a));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is my ruby version 100/100 test on codility, based on the codility test cases, an array with identical absolute values [3,-3] or [3,3] should return 1, here is the example list link

def absolute(a)
    b = Hash.new(0)
    a.each do |x|
        x = x.abs
        b[x] += 1
    end 
    return b.size
end 
share|improve this answer

Here is python implementation: Might not be too different from the accepted solution, but it based on two pointers idea.

def distinct(items):
    l=0
    r=len(items)-1
    count=len( set( [abs( items[l] ),abs( items[r] )] ) )
    a=1
    b=r-1
    while(a<b):
        if items[a]==items[l]:
            a+=1
        elif items[b]==items[r]:
            b-=1
        elif abs(items[a])==abs(items[b]):
            count+=1
            l=a
            r=b
            a+=1
            b-=1
        else:
            count+=2
            l=a
            r=b
            a+=1
            b-=1
    if(abs(items[a])!=abs(items[l]) and abs(items[a])!=abs(items[r]) and abs(items[b])!=abs(items[l]) and abs(items[b])!=abs(items[r])):
        count+=1
    return count
share|improve this answer

Here is C++ code for both implementations with code that generates a randomly sorted integer vector:

#include <vector>
#include <set>
#include <iostream>
#include <random>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;
int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    // generate a vector with random negative and positive integers, then sort it
    // vector<int> vQ2{ -5, -4, -4, -2, 0, 3, 4, 5, 5, 7, 12, 14};
    vector<int> vQ2;
    std::default_random_engine e;
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> d(-10, 10);
    std::function<int()> rnd = std::bind(d, e);
    for(int n=0; n<10; ++n)
        vQ2.push_back(rnd());
    sort(vQ2.begin(),vQ2.end());

    // set (hashfunction) solution (hash)
    set<int> sQ2;
    for_each(vQ2.cbegin(),vQ2.cend(),[&sQ2](const int input) -> void { sQ2.insert( std::abs(input) ); } );
    cout << sQ2.size() << endl;

    // pointers-meeting-in-the-middle solution        
    int absUniqueCount = 0;
    vector<int>::iterator it1 = vQ2.begin();
    vector<int>::iterator it2 = prev(vQ2.end());
    int valueIt1Prev = *it1;
    int valueIt2Prev = *it2;
    while(valueIt1Prev <= valueIt2Prev)
    {
        ++absUniqueCount;
        while(valueIt1Prev == *it1 && abs(valueIt1Prev) >= abs(valueIt2Prev))
        {   advance(it1,1); } // using advance in case of non contiguous memory container (e.g. list)
        while(valueIt2Prev == *it2 && abs(valueIt2Prev) >= abs(valueIt1Prev))
        {   advance(it2,-1); } 
        valueIt1Prev = *it1;
        valueIt2Prev = *it2;
    }
    copy(vQ2.cbegin(),vQ2.cend(),ostream_iterator<int>(cout,",")); cout << endl;
    cout << absUniqueCount << endl;

    return 0;
}

Which gives:

6
-9,-8,-8,-8,-5,0,4,4,6,6,
6
share|improve this answer

JavaScript: 100/100

function solution(A) {
    var count = 1,
        len = A.length,
        S = A.map(function(x){ return Math.abs(x) }).sort();

    for(var i=1;i<len;i++) {
        if(S[i] != S[i-1]) count++;        
    }

    return count;
}
share|improve this answer

Well, to be absolutely honest, you need to do better than this.

Judging from the question, I assume the list do not contain duplicates. Again, obviously the trick is the pre-sorted list. Which means that while +5 may be at the right end of the line, -5 will be at the left end of the line, since negative numbers sort in reverse to their absolute magnitude.

Start from both ends, work inwards. If the two numbers are -1 of each other, then it is not distinct. Otherwise, they are distinct, and move the end that is absolutely larger.

Go until you reach zero, or you bump into the next list -- in that case, take everything remaining in the next list as distinct as well.

This algorithm needs no hashes, no dictionaries, no data structures, and runs in O(n) time, going through the whole list exactly once.

share|improve this answer
2  
I dont think you should assume that the list doesn't contain duplicates. –  brain Apr 20 '11 at 13:15

The solution is to use the fact that the array is sorted. What you can do is to have two pointers pointing at beginning and end of the array respectively. Then based on the abs value, decrease/increase the end-pointer/beginning pointer. At the same time you'll have to keep track of repeated elements in sequence like {3,3,3,4} (the 3 should be counted once).

In all it wouldn't be too complex, I think with 20-25 loc in C.

share|improve this answer
int[] arr= new int[]{-5,-5,-6,-6,-6};
Set<Integer> newSet = new HashSet<Integer>();
for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++)
  newSet.add(Math.abs(arr[i]));    

System.out.println(newSet.size());
share|improve this answer
    
is it jagged array ? –  Tushar Gupta Jun 28 '13 at 10:56
    
read the solution by author who was failed! –  Irfan Aug 8 '13 at 13:47

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