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I have some XML that looks like this:

<root>
  <message name="peter">
    <field type="integer" name="pa" />
    <group name="foo">
      <field type="integer" name="action" />
      <field type="integer" name="id" />
      <field type="integer" name="value" />
    </group>
  </message>
  <message name="wendy">
    <field type="string" name="wa" />
    <group name="foo">
      <field type="integer" name="action" />
      <field type="integer" name="id" />
      <field type="integer" name="value" />
    </group>
  </message>
</root>

I have some XSL that I'm using to generate Java code from this XML. Previously I've been making a key, then generating a Java class for each group.

<xsl:key name="groupsByName" match="//group" use="@name"/>
....
<xsl:for-each select="//group[generate-id(.) = generate-id(key('groupsByName',@name)[1])]">
  <xsl:call-template name="class-for-group"/>
</xsl:for-each>

All was well. Now, I've discovered that some messages have groups using the same name as groups present elsewhere, but missing one of the fields. To continue the example XML from above:

  <message name="nana">
    <field type="string" name="na" />
    <group name="foo">
      <field type="integer" name="id" />
      <field type="integer" name="value" />
    </group>
  </message>

A group named "foo" is present, but it's missing the field with name "action".

What I'd like to do is to generate a Java class for each unique subtree. Is this possible? I can't work out what the xsl:key for that would look like. The closest idea I've had is

<xsl:key name="groupsKey" match="//group" use="concat(@name,count(*))"/>

which works for the case in the example above, but is hardly elegant. If there were instead two groups named "foo" with the same number (but different types) of fields, it would fail, so it's not actually a solution.

To be clear, the ideal key (or whatever alternative) would end up calling the template only once for the "peter" and "wendy" cases above, once for the "nana" case and again once for this case:

  <message name="hook">
    <field type="string" name="ha" />
    <group name="foo">
      <field type="string" name="favourite_breakfast" />
      <field type="integer" name="id" />
      <field type="integer" name="value" />
    </group>
  </message>

...because the fields within the group are different to those in the other cases. My key above doesn't cover this case. Is there a way to do so?

share|improve this question
    
So, what is the question? In case you are asking for someone to provide a "more ellegant" solution, then you must define "ellegant". –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 20 '11 at 12:55
    
@Dimitre, the key I've provided above doesn't actually solve the problem. It's a nasty hack. I'll clarify. –  Jon Bright Apr 20 '11 at 12:56
    
Also, you must show the exact output that must be produced -- otherwise it is not defined and this clearly isn't a problem... –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 20 '11 at 12:58
    
@Jon: Also, it is not clear what exactly is "each unique subtree". –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 20 '11 at 13:02
    
@Dimitre, you don't need to worry about the output. I want it to call a template once for each unique subtree. What's in the template is irrelevant? –  Jon Bright Apr 20 '11 at 13:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This transformation fulfills the requirements:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:ext="http://exslt.org/common"
 >
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="kGroupByType" match="group"
  use="@type"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:variable name="vrtfPass1">
   <xsl:apply-templates />
  </xsl:variable>

  <xsl:apply-templates mode="pass2" 
   select="ext:node-set($vrtfPass1)/*"/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="group">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
   <xsl:call-template name="makeType"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template mode="pass2"
   match="group[generate-id()
               =
                generate-id(key('kGroupByType',@type)[1])
               ]
         ">
  class <xsl:value-of select="concat(@name, '|', @type)"/>

 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template name="makeType">
  <xsl:attribute name="type">
   <xsl:text>(</xsl:text>
   <xsl:for-each select="*">
     <xsl:value-of select="@type"/>
     <xsl:if test="not(position()=last())">+</xsl:if>
   </xsl:for-each>
   <xsl:text>)</xsl:text>
  </xsl:attribute>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied on the provided XML document (with all additions):

<root>
    <message name="peter">
        <field type="integer" name="pa" />
        <group name="foo">
            <field type="integer" name="action" />
            <field type="integer" name="id" />
            <field type="integer" name="value" />
        </group>
    </message>
    <message name="wendy">
        <field type="string" name="wa" />
        <group name="foo">
            <field type="integer" name="action" />
            <field type="integer" name="id" />
            <field type="integer" name="value" />
        </group>
    </message>
    <message name="nana">
        <field type="string" name="na" />
        <group name="foo">
            <field type="integer" name="id" />
            <field type="integer" name="value" />
        </group>
    </message>
    <message name="hook">
        <field type="string" name="ha" />
        <group name="foo">
            <field type="string" name="favourite_breakfast" />
            <field type="integer" name="id" />
            <field type="integer" name="value" />
        </group>
    </message>
</root>

the wanted result is produced:

  class foo|(integer+integer+integer)
  class foo|(integer+integer)
  class foo|(string+integer+integer)

It is left as an exercise to the reader to further adjust this to produce valid names in one's PL, and also to make this work with structures of unlimited nestedness (which I may do in another answer -- however, we need a more precise definition for this more general provlem).

share|improve this answer
    
Dimitre, many thanks. I'm still working on integrating this answer into my own XSLT. As soon as I've done so and confirmed for myself that it's working, I'll mark it correct. –  Jon Bright Apr 20 '11 at 17:20
    
@Jon-Bright: You are welcome. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 20 '11 at 17:27
    
+1 Correct answer: complex key (beyond the scope of XPath/XSLT expressions) will need this transformation composition. –  user357812 Apr 20 '11 at 22:49
    
All now working, thanks again. Dimitre: when using exslt, in an answer, it might be worth highlighting that. In my case, I first had to switch to processing using Xalan (rather than whatever the JRE default is) before things started working. –  Jon Bright Apr 21 '11 at 11:30
    
@Jon-Bright: Good remark: I usually specify the EXSLT ext:node-set() because it is implemented by the majority of XSLT processors. Also, haven't thought its use would go unnoticed, because a new namespace is defined on the top element -- that clearly shows EXSLT is used. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 21 '11 at 12:30

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