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Is there a difference between masking a signal using sigprocmask() and ignoring a signal using signal(<signal>, SIG_IGN)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Blocking is different from ignoring. You ignore a signal by installing SIG_IGN with sigaction().

After a signal is generated by the kernel or a process, the kernel makes it pending to some process(es). The signal is said to be delivered to a process once the process acts on the signal. A process may block a signal, which leaves the signal pending until it is unblocked. A signal which is not blocked will be delivered immediately. The signal mask specifies which signals are blocked. A process can determine which signals are pending.

Most UNIX's will not queue multiple instances of the same pending signal; only one instance of each signal can be pending.

Setting a signal action to SIG_IGN for a signal that is pending will cause the pending signal to be discarded, whether or not it is blocked.

And the process signal mask contains the set of signals that are currently blocked.

When a process blocks a signal, an occurrence of the signal is held until the signal is unblocked (blocked signals do not get lost, whereas ignored signals do get lost).

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When you mask a signal it actually tells the kernel that this signal won't be delivered to the process till the mask is it.This doesn't means the signal wont occur ever again in the context of the process.Its just placed in a queue.This is usually done when you want to receive the signal but not during certain operation.A masked signal usually implies this signal can mean something to me but let it wait if it comes before I finish with this job. An ignored signal usually means that the signal is of no use to the process.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<signal.h>
#include<sys/types.h>
int main()
{
sigset_t test; //test signal set

alarm(1); //set alarm,SIGALRM generated after 1 second
sigemptyset(&test);

sigaddset(&test,SIGALRM);
sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK,&test,NULL); //mask sigalrm
sleep(3); //sleep for 3 seconds ensuring the signal is generated and is waiting in the queue
sigprocmask(SIG_UNBLOCK,&test,NULL); //unblock
}

This refers to case 1.The signal is masked.But It lies there waiting and delivered as soon as you need it The strace output confirms this

   alarm(1)                                = 0
   rt_sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, [ALRM], NULL, 8) = 0
   rt_sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, [CHLD], [ALRM], 8) = 0
   rt_sigaction(SIGCHLD, NULL, {SIG_DFL, [], 0}, 8) = 0
   rt_sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, [ALRM], NULL, 8) = 0
   nanosleep({3, 0}, 0xbfee9ea4)           = 0
   rt_sigprocmask(SIG_UNBLOCK, [ALRM], NULL, 8) = 0
   --- SIGALRM (Alarm clock) @ 0 (0) ---
   +++ killed by SIGALRM +++

While for the second case

 #include<stdio.h>
 #include<signal.h>
 int main()
{
alarm(1);
signal(SIGALRM,SIG_IGN);

sleep(3);
signal(SIGALRM,SIG_DFL);
return 0;
}

The strace o/p suggest a different story

   alarm(1)                                = 0
   rt_sigaction(SIGALRM, {SIG_IGN, [ALRM], SA_RESTART}, {SIG_DFL, [], 0}, 8) = 0
   rt_sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, [CHLD], [], 8) = 0
   rt_sigaction(SIGCHLD, NULL, {SIG_DFL, [], 0}, 8) = 0
   rt_sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, [], NULL, 8) = 0
   nanosleep({3, 0}, {2, 691998})          = ? ERESTART_RESTARTBLOCK (To be restarted)
   --- SIGALRM (Alarm clock) @ 0 (0) ---
   restart_syscall(<... resuming interrupted call ...>) = 0
   rt_sigaction(SIGALRM, {SIG_DFL, [ALRM], SA_RESTART}, {SIG_IGN, [ALRM], SA_RESTART},                         8) = 0
   exit_group(0)                           = ?

The signal did got delivered but nothing happened except interrupting(and restarting sleep).

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