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I post a strange behavior that could be reproduced (at least on apache2+php5). I don't know if I am doing wrong but let me explain what I try to achieve.

I need to send chunks of binary data (let's say 30) and analyze the average Kbit/s at the end :

I sum each chunk output time, each chunk size, and perform my Kbit/s calculation at the end.

    <?php

// build my binary chunk
$var= '';
$o=10000;
while($o--)
{
    $var.= pack('N', 85985);
}

// get the size, prepare the memory.
$size = strlen($var);
$tt_sent = 0;
$tt_time = 0;

// I send my chunk 30 times
for ($i = 0; $i < 30; $i++)
{
    // start time
    $t = microtime(true);
    echo $var."\n";
    ob_flush();
    flush();
    $e = microtime(true);
    // end time
    // the difference should reprenent what it takes to the server to 
    // transmit chunk to client right ?

    // add this chuck bench to the total
    $tt_time += round($e-$t,4);
    $tt_sent += $size;
}

// total result
echo "\n total: ".(($tt_sent*8)/($tt_time)/1024)."\n";

?>

In this example above, it works so far ( on localhost, it oscillate from 7000 to 10000 Kbit/s through different tests).

Now, let's say I want to shape the transmission, because I know that the client will have enough of a chunk of data to process for a second.

I decide to use usleep(1000000), to mark a pause between chunk transmission.

    <?php

// build my binary chunk
$var= '';
$o=10000;
while($o--)
{
    $var.= pack('N', 85985);
}

// get the size, prepare the memory.
$size = strlen($var);
$tt_sent = 0;
$tt_time = 0;

// I send my chunk 30 times
for ($i = 0; $i < 30; $i++)
{
    // start time
    $t = microtime(true);
    echo $var."\n";
    ob_flush();
    flush();
    $e = microtime(true);
    // end time
    // the difference should reprenent what it takes to the server to 
    // transmit chunk to client right ?

    // add this chuck bench to the total
    $tt_time += round($e-$t,4);
    $tt_sent += $size;

    usleep(1000000);
}

// total result
echo "\n total: ".(($tt_sent*8)/($tt_time)/1024)."\n";

?>

In this last example, I don't know why, the calculated bandwidth can jump from 72000 Kbit/s to 1,200,000, it is totally inaccurate / irrelevant. Part of the problem is that the time measured to output my chunk is ridiculously low each time a chunk is sent (after the first usleep).

I am doing something wrong ? Does the buffer output is not synchronous ?

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1 Answer 1

I'm not sure how definitive these tests are, but I found it interesting. On my box I'm averaging around 170000 kb/s. From a networked box this number goes up to around 280000 kb/s. I guess we have to assume microtime(true) is fairly accurate even though I read it's operating system dependent. Are you on a Linux based system? The real question is how do we calculate the kilobits transferred in a 1 second time period? I try to project how many chunks can be sent in 1 second and then store the calculated Kb/s to be averaged at the end. I added a sleep(1) before flush() and this results in a negative kb/s as to be expected.

Something don't feel right and I would be interested in knowing if you have improved your testing method. Good Luck!

<?php
// build my binary chunk
$var= '';
$o=10000;

//Alternative to get actual bytes
$m1 = memory_get_usage();
while($o--)
{
    $var.= pack('N', 85985);
}
$m2 = memory_get_usage();

//Your size estimate
$size = strlen($var);

//Calculate alternative bytes
$bytes = ($m2 - $m1); //40108

//Convert to Kilobytes 1 Kilobyte = 1024 bytes
$kilobytes = $size/1024;

//Convert to Kilobits 1 byte = 8 bits
$kilobits = $kilobytes * 8;

//Display our data for the record
echo "<pre>size: $size</pre>";
echo "<pre>bytes: $bytes</pre>";
echo "<pre>kilobytes: $kilobytes</pre>";
echo "<pre>kilobits: $kilobits</pre>";
echo "<hr />";

//The test count
$count = 100;

//Initialize total kb/s variable
$total = 0;

for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++)
{
    // Start Time
    $start = microtime(true);

    // Utilize html comment to prevent browser from parsing
    echo "<!-- $var -->";

    // End Time
    $end = microtime(true);

    // Seconds it took to flush binary chunk
    $seconds = $end - $start;

    // Calculate how many chunks we can send in 1 second
    $chunks = (1/$seconds);

    // Calculate the kilobits per second
    $kbs = $chunks * $kilobits;

    // Store the kbs and we'll average all of them out of the loop
    $total += $kbs;
}

//Process the average (data generation) kilobits per second
$average = $total/$count;

echo "<h4>Average kbit/s: $average</h4>";

Analysis

Even though I arrive at some arbitrary value in the test, it is still a value that can be measured. Using a networked computer adds insight into what is really going on. I would have thought the localhost machine would have a higher value then the networked box, but tests prove otherwise in a big way. When on the localhost we have to both send the raw binary data and receive it. This of course shows that two threads are sharing cpu cycles and therefore the supposed kb/s value is in fact lower when testing in a browser on the same machine. We are therefore really measuring cpu cycles and we obtain higher values when the server is allowed to be a server.

Some interesting things start to show up when you increase the test count to 1000. First don't make the browser parse the data. It takes alot of cpu to attempt to render raw data at such high test cases. We can manually watch what is going on with say system monitor and task manager. In my case the local is a linux server and the network box is xp. You can obtain some real kb/s speeds this way and it makes it obvious that we are dynamically serving up data using mainly the cpu and network interfaces. The server doesn't replicate the data and, therefore no matter how high we set the test count, we only need 40 kilobytes of memory space. So 40 kilobytes can generate 40 megabytes dynamically at a 1000 test cases and 400mb at 10000 cases.

I crashed firefox in xp with a virtual memory to low error after running the test case 10000 several times. System monitor on the linux server showed some understandable spikes in cpu and network, but overall pushed out a large amount of data really quick and had plenty of room to spare. Running 10000 cases on linux a few times actually spun up the swap drive and pegged the server cpu cycle. The most interesting fact though is that my values that I obtained above only changed when I was both receiving in firefox and transmitting in apache when testing locally. I practically locked up the xp box, yet my network value of ~280000 kb/s did not change on the print out.

Conclusion:

The kb/s value we arrive at above is virtually useless other then to prove its useless. The test itself however shows some interesting things. At high test cases I beleive I could actually see some physical buffering going on in both the server and the client . Our test script actually dumps the data to apache and it gets released to continue its work. Apache handles the details of the transfer of course. This is actually nice to know, but proves we can't measure the actual transmission rate from our server to browser this way. We can measure our servers data generation rate I guess if thats meaningful in some way. Guess what! Flushing actually slowed down the speeds. Theres a penalty for flushing. In this case, there is no reason for it and removing flush() actually speeds up our data generation rate. Since we are not dealing with networking, our value above is actually more meaningful kept as Kilobytes. It's useless any ways so I'm not changing.

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Adding usleep(50000) in between start and end times results in local and network box being consistent at around 310 kb/s. Anywhere else in the loop it works as expected, except the local box drops down to around 100 kb/s. The network box doesn't seem affected by the delay. I'm not finding unusual behavior of usleep or sleep when using the updated test script. –  daganh Apr 21 '11 at 21:45
    
Are you on a Linux based system? -> yes. The real question is how do we calculate the kilobits transferred in a 1 second time period? -> not exactly. I want to know how much time it takes for the client to receive a chunk of data, then sleep to make bandwidth shaping. Thanks for your time, I am testing your results to be sure if I am not doing something wrong. –  nunja Apr 26 '11 at 6:53
    
@nunja "How much time it takes for the client to receive a chunk of data." Testing shows that we can't do it this way. A javascript solution would be better in this case, but you didn't imply the client was a browser. The client will have access to the actual data rate. Some JQuery solution could give you feedback and allow some "traffic shaping". Gook luck and hope you post your solution for others that are interested. –  daganh Apr 26 '11 at 7:53
    
My feeling is that the solution is to use direct Socket Connection. But on my server, I am restricted to use apache2 and the port 80. –  nunja Apr 26 '11 at 9:57
    
Is there any solution to write data in the incoming apache socket ? –  nunja Apr 26 '11 at 9:58
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