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I have been using a custom type for Money with my POCOs and tries to insert this to my database but it is implicitly thrown away by Entity Framework.

This is my code made simple;

My type;

public struct Money
{
    private static decimal _value;

    public Money(Decimal value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }

    public static implicit operator Money(Decimal value)
    {
        return new Money(value);
    }

    public static implicit operator decimal(Money value)
    {
        return _value;
    }
}

My object;

public class MyObject
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public Money MyMoney { get; set; }
}

My context;

public class Data : DbContext
{
    public Data()
        : base("Data Source=.;Database=MyTest;Integrated Security=True")
    {}

    public DbSet<MyObject> MyObject { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {

        modelBuilder.Entity<MyObject>()
            .Property(p => p.MyMoney).HasColumnName("MyMoney");

    }
}

When I use this code I get the following error.

The property 'MyMoney' is not a declared property on type 'MyObject'. Verify that the property has not been explicitly excluded from the model by using the Ignore method or NotMappedAttribute data annotation. Make sure that it is a valid primitive property.

I guess the problem is the last sentence.... Then, what is a valid primitive property? Is there any other way to take care of this?

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Per, Maybe you can helpe me: stackoverflow.com/q/6794565/828162 –  iuristona Jul 22 '11 at 20:06

3 Answers 3

You could take of it by explicitly mapping a decimal property and only exposing the Money Property to callers:

public class MyObject
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    protected decimal MyMoney { get; set; }
    public Money MyMoneyStruct 
    { 
        get { return (Money)this.MyMoney; } 
        set { this.MyMoney = (decimal)value; }
    }
}
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+1. EF does not support scalar user types –  Diego Mijelshon Apr 20 '11 at 18:09
1  
Good idea. Unfortunatelly code-first doesn't map protected and private fields. To overcome this you must use nested EntityConfiguration in each entity which makes your entity project EF dependent. –  Ladislav Mrnka Apr 20 '11 at 19:49
    
@Ladislav, thanks, I didn't know that. That seems like kind of an oversight as I would expect it to allow protected fields. Oh well. I suppose one could always expose both, or use EntityConfiguration as you described. –  Steve Danner Apr 20 '11 at 20:26
    
@Steve: You can also use internal fields and play with it. There are two problems: default mapping maps only public members and both EntityConfiguration and OnModelCreating use fluent API which is limited to accessibility of members. –  Ladislav Mrnka Apr 20 '11 at 20:30
    
Yes, I did think this would be a possible way even though not optimal but I got stuck with the limitation of scope. Any other idea? I got one myself, making my struct a class instead and use ComplexTypeConfiguration. I haven't tried it yet but i will. –  Per Apr 20 '11 at 21:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, this went to be my solution.

public class MyObject
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public Money MyMoney { get { return (Money)MyMoneyInternal; } set { MyMoneyInternal = (decimal)value; } }
    private decimal MyMoneyInternal { get; set; }
}

To be able to read that private property I created a property extension as below. Since some of my properties of type Money is Nullable I had to take care of that as well.

public static class PropertyExtensions
{
    public static PrimitivePropertyConfiguration Property<TClass, TProperty>(this EntityTypeConfiguration<TClass> etc, string propertyName)
        where TClass : class
        where TProperty : struct
    {
        PrimitivePropertyConfiguration returnValue;
        Type type = typeof(TClass);

        var propertyInfo = type.GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

        ParameterExpression parameterExpression = Expression.Parameter(type, "xyz");
        MemberExpression memberExpression = Expression.Property((Expression)parameterExpression, propertyInfo);

        if (IsNullable(memberExpression.Type))
        {
            returnValue = etc.Property((Expression<Func<TClass, TProperty?>>)Expression.Lambda(memberExpression, parameterExpression));
        }
        else
        {
            returnValue = etc.Property((Expression<Func<TClass, TProperty>>)Expression.Lambda(memberExpression, parameterExpression));
        }

        return returnValue;
    }

    private static bool IsNullable(Type type)
    {
        bool result;

        if (type.IsGenericType)
        {
            var genericType = type.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
            result = genericType.Equals(typeof(Nullable<>));
        }
        else
        {
            result = false;
        }

        return result;
    }
}

And then I could use that to read my private property.

modelBuilder.Entity<MyObject>()
            .Property<MyObject, decimal>("MyMoneyInternal").HasColumnName("MyMoney");

Thank you Steve for taking me in the right direction.

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You could also have transformed your "Money" in a Complex class; which would make the exposed properties in-line in your database. With only the Decimal property, it would look like Money_Value (given you expose Value as a property). Let's say you add "Currency" as a string to the class. You would then have also Money_Currency in the database.

To declare to EF that your class is a Complex type, just annotate it with [ComplexType()].

To get the best of Struct + ComplexType, you could even use both at the time : the complex type using the struct internally (the ComplexType just being a wrapper).

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