Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've to read data from binary file. This binary data format is: 0x00 0x00 0x01 - is delimiter after this delimiter there is raw data byte array. So, to sum up, my binary file looks like:

0x00 0x00 0x01 (here is raw data byte) 0x00 0x00 0x01 (here is another block of raw data bytes) 0x00 0x00 0x01 ....

So i've wrote such code to parse my file (I'm not very familiar with C)

ifstream inp("myfile.bin",ios::binary);
char b1, b2, b3;
while (!inp.eof())
    {
        inp.read(&b1,sizeof(b1));
        inp.read(&b2,sizeof(b2));
        inp.read(&b3,sizeof(b3));
        //finding first delimiter (data starts from delimiter)
        while (!((0==b1)&&(0==b2)&&(1==b3)))
        {
            b1=b2;
            b2=b3;
            if (inp.eof())
                break;      
            inp.read(&b3,sizeof(b3));
        }
        if (inp.eof())
            break;              
        char* raw=new char[65535];
        int rawSize=0;

        inp.read(&b1,sizeof(b1));
        inp.read(&b2,sizeof(b2));
        inp.read(&b3,sizeof(b3));

        raw[rawSize++]=b1;
        raw[rawSize++]=b2;
        if (inp.eof())
            break;  

        //reading raw data until delimiter is found
        while (!((0==b1)&&(0==b2)&&(1==b3)))
        {
            raw[rawSize++]=b3;
            b1=b2;
            b2=b3;
            if (inp.eof())
                break;      
            inp.read(&b3,sizeof(b3));
        }
        rawSize-=2; //because of two bytes of delimiter (0x00 0x00) would be added to raw

        //Do something with raw data

        if (inp.eof())
            break;

        inp.putback(1);
        inp.putback(0);
        inp.putback(0);

        delete []raw;
    }

But sometimes this code falls into infinite loop. Could you advice me something? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
way too much C++, consider removing the C tag –  pmg Apr 20 '11 at 13:56
    
eof is there to find out the cause of a failed read, not to predict that the next read will fail because of the end of file. –  AProgrammer Apr 20 '11 at 13:59
    
possible duplicate of Read a file twice in C++ because of eof ? –  AProgrammer Apr 20 '11 at 14:00
    
So what should I do in my situation? –  stemm Apr 20 '11 at 14:01
    
In fact, I've noticed that program falls into infinite loop nearly in the middle of the binary file....not in the end of file –  stemm Apr 20 '11 at 14:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the problem there is that putback fails. As far as i recall, putback is guaranteed to work only once; second invocation will fail if the internal read buffer is aligned (that is, very rarely; seems like your situation).

To fix, get rid of putback. First of all, move the loop commented as "finding first delimiter" out of the outer while loop: the comment suggests that this code should only run once. After you do it, pay attention that at the beginning of the outer while loop, the sequence 0x00 0x00 0x01 has just been found, so the code doesn't have to use putback and look for it again.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks much :) It helps) –  stemm Apr 20 '11 at 16:32
  • You're using feof() wrong, it's only valid after a read has been attempted and failed.

  • How do you know that your magic byte sequence 0 0 1 doesn't appear inside the data? If the data is just a "binary array" that doesn't sound like it provides much of a guarantee ...

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly known that byte sequence 0 0 1 doesn't appear inside the data. In fact, I've noticed that program falls infinite loop nearly in the middle of the binary file.... –  stemm Apr 20 '11 at 14:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.