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I have a text file containing first and last 'syllables', demarcated with [part1] and [part2]:

[part1]
Ae
Di
Mo
Fam
[part2]
dar
kil
glar
tres

All I want to do is pick a random line, between [part1] and [part2], and then another random line between [part2] and the end of the file, and concatenate the two together (e.g. "Aedar", "Moglar") to create random names.

However I am unsure how to parse the text file effectively with readline(). Is there a better way than scanning through each line sequentially, and storing all of them in a list from whence I can pick a random element?

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2  
It seems you have control of the file format, can't you change it to something easier to parse? –  Fábio Diniz Apr 20 '11 at 14:13
3  
It would be a lot easier to use two files. –  Adam Matan Apr 20 '11 at 14:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Serialize (pickle) a dictionary to a file instead.

Example:

# create the dict and save it to a file
d={
'part1':[
    'Ae',
    'Di',
    'Mo',
    'Fam',],
'part2':[
    'dar',
    'kil',
    'glar',
    'tres',],
}

import pickle
f=open('syllables','w')
pickle.dump(d,f)
f.close()


# read the dict back in from the file
f1=open('syllables','r')
sd=pickle.load(f1)
f1.close()

import random
first_part=sd['part1'][random.randint(0,len(sd['part1'])-1)]
second_part=sd['part2'][random.randint(0,len(sd['part2'])-1)]

print '%s%s'%(first_part,second_part)
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1  
sd['part1'][random.randint(0,len(sd['part1'])-1)] ... or simply random.choice(sd['part1']) or the whole last lines as print ''.join(random.choice(sd[partName]) for partName in sorted(sd)) –  eumiro Apr 20 '11 at 14:32
    
@eumiro - yep, saw your answer below, definitely more elegant. great job! –  AJ. Apr 20 '11 at 14:34
    
@AJ - anyway, your dict/pickle idea is better than the original file. –  eumiro Apr 20 '11 at 14:36
    
@eumiro - thanks! I definitely prefer the idea of separating the creating/maintaining of the file (admin functions) from the consuming of its data (business/application functions). pickle just seemed like a very simple protocol to use between those two users/roles. –  AJ. Apr 20 '11 at 14:39
1  
I understand, but I would like the data to exist in the text file- unless I'm mistaken, aren't we pickling the dict to a file, then unpickling it back as an object again? Is there a way I can just have the declaration for d in a text file and not in the code? –  persepolis Apr 20 '11 at 14:48
import random
parts = {}

with open('parts.txt', 'r') as f:
    currentList = []
    for line in f.readlines():
        line = line.strip()
        if line.startswith('[') and line.endswith(']'):
            currentList = []
            parts[line[1:-1]] = currentList
        else:
            currentList.append(line.strip())


for i in xrange(10):    
    print ''.join(random.choice(parts[partName]) for partName in sorted(parts))

returns (randomly):

Aekil
Didar
Mokil
Mokil
Moglar
Moglar
Diglar
Famdar
Famdar
Modar
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2  
'r' is a default mode; you can omit it. f.readlines() reads a whole file in memory; for line in f: could be used instead. You could write currentLIne = parts[line[1:-1]] = [] on a single line. The first currentList (before any '[part...]' lines) is not added anywhere (the values are discarded). –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 20 '11 at 14:55
1  
You could use fileinput.input() instead of hardcoding the filename. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 20 '11 at 14:57
1  
here's what I mean: stackoverflow.com/questions/5731670/… –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 20 '11 at 15:20

You'll have to read through the entire file at some point, unless you know beforehand how many prefixes and suffixes there are. Since I assume you don't, or that it can change and you don't want to maintain a number for storing that, you'll have to read through the file, and readline() is a good way of doing that.

However, you can preprocess your text file so that it uses another format, such as a pickle file. In other words, read the text file into a dictionary, and pickle that dictionary. The dictionary might look something like this:

dic = {'prefixes': ['Ae' ,'di', ...], 'suffixes': ['dar', 'kil', ...]}

From the lenght of the arrays you can then determine what the maximum random number is. It should be more efficient than reading an entire file line-for-line each time. And if not, at least it's a bit more elegant solution.

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Modified @eumiro's script:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import fileinput
import random
import re
from collections import defaultdict

partname = ''
parts = defaultdict(list)
for line in fileinput.input():
    line = line.rstrip()
    if line.startswith('[') and re.match(r'\[part\d+\]', line):
        partname = line
    else:
        parts[partname].append(line)

parts_list = list(map(parts.get, sorted(parts)))
for _ in range(10):
    print(''.join(map(random.choice, parts_list)))

Output

Famglar
Famkil
Didar
Ditres
Aedar
Famglar
Ditres
Famtres
Ditres
Modar
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