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I'm very confused about this topic, basically I've this code:

template <typename T>
class SListArray
{
public:
    class const_iterator
    {
    public:
        const_iterator(size_t i_currentNode = -1)
            :m_position(i_currentNode)
        {
        }

        T const& operator*() const
        {
            return m_data[m_position].element;
        }

        // ...

    protected:
        size_t m_position;
    };

    explicit SListArray();

    // ...

private:
    std::vector<Node<T>> m_data;

    // ...
};

This code give me a compiler error, so, I would to know if is possible to give the Inner Class the acces to the members of the Outer Class.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

Nested classes already have access to the containing class's members, assuming they have a pointer/reference to the containing class upon which to operate. Your iterator will need to store a reference to the outer class in order to be able to access the container as you appear to want.

Also note that protected data is usually a code smell and should typically be avoided. Prefer private data and a protected interface if appropriate.

EDIT: Unless this is strictly an exercise to learn how to program a container, just use one of the C++ standard containers such as vector which are well developed, debugged, and optimized.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, as I say to Nawaz, it's an exercise. Regard the protected data, it's so because I've an iterator class that inherits from const_iterator. – enigma Apr 20 '11 at 15:12
    
@enigma Are you sure that relationship represents substitution? It seems that in the long term inheriting your iterator from const_iterator may cause more problems than it solves in the short term. – Mark B Apr 20 '11 at 15:24
    
The non-const iterator can (or even should) derive from the const_iterator. Usually that way it's much easier to compare non-const and const iterators, assign a non-const iterator to a const-iterator, and so on. And it's a proper substitution: everywhere where a const_iterator can be used, a non-const iterator can also be used. – Sjoerd Apr 21 '11 at 21:33

As Sjoerd already answered, you can give the access by using friend keyword. However, if you are looking for Java-style inner classes, there is no such thing in C++.

share|improve this answer

Yes, use a friend declaration.

private:
  std::vector<Node<T> > m_data;
  friend class const_iterator;

Update: Oh, and your access to m_data is wrong. The inner class cannot access the members of the outer class without a pointer to an instance of the outer class. So you have to adjust your const_iterator class to store a pointer/reference to the outer class, and use this pointer/reference in the operator*().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it's clear. And yes, in my code, the access to m_data is wrong. – enigma Apr 20 '11 at 15:04

Although making const_iterator a friend of SListArray would solve your problem, but I'm wondering why don't you use std::vector . Why yet another new generic class?

If you're looking for a new name, then you can typedef as:

typedef std::vector<Node<int>>                 NodeList;
typedef std::vector<Node<int>>::iterator       NodeIterator;
typedef std::vector<Node<int>>::const_iterator NodeConstIterator;
share|improve this answer
    
Your observation is correct. But I'm just implementing a Singly Linked List in different forms, for exercise. – enigma Apr 20 '11 at 15:10

Pass a reference:

class const_iterator {
public:
   const_iterator(ListArray<T> &arr) : arr(arr) { }
private:
   ListArray<T> &arr;
};

And then you need the friend stuff too.

share|improve this answer

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