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somebody can tell me why the program dont work?

int main()
{
    char *num = 'h';
    printf("%c", num);
    return 0;
}

the error is: 1>c:\users\\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\sssdsdsds\sssdsdsds\sssdsdsds.cpp(4): error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'char' to 'char *'

but if I write the code like that:

int main()
{
    char num = 'h';
    printf("%c", num);
    return 0;
}

its work?

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2  
Why would you expect it to work? What do you think the '*' means, and why do you think putting it there doesn't matter? –  Jim Balter Apr 20 '11 at 15:22

4 Answers 4

char *num = 'h';

Here, the letter 'h' is a char, which you are trying to assign to a char*. The two types are not the same, so you get the problem that you see above.

This would work:

char *num = "h";

The difference is that here you're using double-quotes ("), which creates a char*.

This would also work:

char letter = 'h';
char* ptrToLetter = &letter;

You should read up on pointers in C to understand exactly what these different constructions do.

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char * is a pointer to a char, what is different than a single char.

If you have char *, then you must initialize it with ", not with '.

And also, into printf, a char * must be formatted as %s.
The %c is only for char.

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In thefirst case you declared num as a pointer to a char. In the second case, you declare it as a char. In each case, you assign a char to the variable. You can't assign a char to a pointer to a char, hence the error.

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'h' = Char "h" = Null terminated String

int main()
{
    char *num = "h";
    printf("%s", num);   // <= here change c to s if you want to print out string
    return 0;
}

this will work

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