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I have a test-server and a production-server. I need different .htaccess files for test and production. On test I want the PHP 'display errors' to be on, but I don't want that on production of course.

I know I can set 'display errors' in PHP too, but then I have to do that in each script that I run. Doing it with :

php_flag display_errors On

in .htaccess in the root folder is much easier.

So my question is, how can I make 2 different .htaccess files and depending on the server automatically use the right one?

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3  
Why don't you just change php.ini? –  halfdan Apr 20 '11 at 15:37
    
Can't you just use two different files? Keep one on your local machine and make sure you don't overwrite the live one with it... –  DisgruntledGoat Apr 20 '11 at 15:38
    
@DisgrunteldGoat: that's what I'm doing now. But then you'll always have to be careful when deploying. Should be better if it's automatic, which I already use for database settings etc (config.php that looks up the server name/domain it runs on). –  Dylan Apr 20 '11 at 16:12
1  
@halfdan: I can't just change php.ini since there are other domains on this server too, some test and some production –  Dylan Apr 20 '11 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

Apache is using a configuration directive to find these files:

AccessFileName .htaccess

So if you change your development server with

AccessFileName .htaccessdev

in /etc/apache2.conf , then you can handle 2 versions of settings, one for production in .htaccess and one for development in .htaccessdev. Security filters are usually fine and defined this way:

<Files ~ "^\.ht">
  Order allow,deny
  Deny from all
</Files>

which covers both names.

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