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Let's say I inherit from IMyManager a SetModel. If I implement it I would normally write:

using lib.model;

namespace MyComponents
{
    public class MyManager:IMyManager
    {

        public void SetModel(ILibModel model)
        {

        }

    }
}

That's fine for compiler.

Now let's say that instead of ILibModel I pass a concrete class MyModel which implement ILibModel.

Why compiler doesn't accept this whereas MyModel is of type ILibModel :

namespace MyComponents
{
    public class MyManager:IMyManager
    {

        public void SetModel(MyModel model) {

        }
    }
}
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming that MyModel implements ILibModel the reason this does not work is because while all MyModel types are ILibModel types, the inverse does not hold true. That's to say not all ILibModel types are MyModel types.

The interface explicitly states that it MUST take ILibModel types. So an implementation that takes just MyModel does not meet your interface contract, because of the fact that a type, say MyOtherModel that also implements ILibModel is a valid type to be passed in based on your interface's contract.

The only way around this would be to potentially use generics on the interface. An example being:

public interface IMyManager<TModel>
    where T : ILibModel
{
    void SetModel(TModel model);
}

public class MyManager : IMyManager<MyModel>
{
    void SetModel(MyModel model)
    {

    }
}

However, you may run into issues with co-variance and contra-variance with such a system.

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the inverse does not hold true but I'm not in the inverse case. The problem is rather than this stupid interface just doesn't automatically do casting whereas It should. –  user310291 Apr 21 '11 at 7:07
    
Thanks for generics will see if it can fit. –  user310291 Apr 21 '11 at 7:08
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Because you are supplying an overload for the SetModel function. As far as the compiler is concerned, perhaps you want to allow the programmer to do something more specific with the concrete type, while doing something else with the interface version.

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because someone could later write:

((IMyManager)myManager).SetModel(new OtherClassThatImplementsILibModel());
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Because the IMyManager defines SetModel that way.

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