Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm in the planning phase for a new application I'm writing for Windows (at least Win 7, Vista and Win XP if possible as well). Additionally, if it can be arranged, I'd love for the app to run on OS X (Snow Leopard), but this is not a requirement.

Anyway, on to the question. The app requires API functionality to perform the following tasks:

  • Capture arbitrary portions of the screen (up to several frames per second) (also displaying the mouse pointer, if possible)
  • Capture all audio output being generated by the sound card
  • Manipulate the mouse programmatically (move and click)

Does .NET have API functionality for these requirements? If not, what would be a good alternative?


(Note: From my requirements, it may seem that the application could be malware. However, I assure you it is not - it will be a sort of macro recorder/playback mechanism for streamlining media consumption). Thanks, everyone! :)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

No. you could do these with P/Invokes.

share|improve this answer

To my knowledge, there is no such API. Aside, rally25rs' answer seems to say it exists.

In my opinion, such behaviour might be acquainted using Win32's API, or else, develop yourself a C/C++ library in which you will be able to accomplish whatever you like, since you will not be constrained with .NET resource access limitations, if I may say.

share|improve this answer

The .NET framework does not have low level wrappers for this functionality. You can achieve low level functionality with a little creativity, pinvoke, and directsound. I've done all these things in past C# applications. These links should get you there fairly quickly (note DirectSound is a bit challenging to get going the first time through)...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee416960%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

http://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/user32/mouse_event.html

http://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/user32/sendinput.html

share|improve this answer

Its been a while since I've done it, but I think you can move the mouse cursor to a position with:

Cursor.Position = Drawing.Point(x, y)

You can definately capture the screen (assuming you mean a screenshot). This is a bit of a copy/paste mess, but:

public class ScreenCapture : IDisposable
{
private string filePath = "";
private Attachment attachment;
private Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(1, 1);
private MemoryStream imageStream = new MemoryStream();

public ScreenCapture() { }

void IDisposable.Dispose()
{
  Dispose();
}
public void Dispose()
{
  if (bitmap != null)
    bitmap.Dispose();
  if (imageStream != null)
    imageStream.Close();
}

# region Property Methods
public string FilePath
{
  get { return filePath; }
}
# endregion  // Property Methods

# region Private Methods
/// <summary>
/// Capture the specified region into a bitmap object.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sourcePoint">The point at the upper-left corner of the source rectangle.</param>
/// <param name="destinationPoint">The point at the upper-left corner of the destination rectangle.</param>
/// <param name="selectionRectangle">The size of the area to be transferred.</param>
private void CaptureRegionToBitmap(Point sourcePoint, Point destinationPoint, Rectangle selectionRectangle)
{
  if (bitmap != null)
    bitmap.Dispose();

  bitmap = new Bitmap(selectionRectangle.Width, selectionRectangle.Height);
  using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap))
    g.CopyFromScreen(sourcePoint, destinationPoint, selectionRectangle.Size);
}
# endregion  // Private Methods

# region Public Methods
/// <summary>
/// Create an attachment to append to an email message.
/// </summary>
/// <returns>Returns an email attachment.</returns>
public Attachment GenerateAttachment()
{
  return GenerateAttachment("");
}
/// <summary>
/// Create an attachment from the generated bitmap to append to an email message.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="imageName">Provide a name for the attachment.</param>
/// <returns>Returns email attachment.</returns>
public Attachment GenerateAttachment(string imageName)
{
  if (attachment != null)
    attachment.Dispose();

  if (imageName == null || imageName.Trim() == "")
    imageName = Core.LoginUserName.ToLower() + "_image.png";

  bitmap.Save(imageStream, ImageFormat.Png);
  imageStream.Position = 0;
  attachment = new Attachment(imageStream, imageName, "image/png");
  return attachment;
}
/// <summary>
/// Capture the entire screen to a Bitmap object stored in memory.
/// </summary>
public void CaptureFullScreen()
{
  CaptureRegionToBitmap(new Point(0, 0), new Point(0, 0), SystemInformation.VirtualScreen);
}
/// <summary>
/// Save the generated bitmap to a physical file on disk.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="filePath"></param>
/// <returns>Returns True if save was successful; otherwise False.</returns>
public bool SaveToDisk(string filePath)
{
  bool saveSuccessful = false;
  try
  {
    bitmap.Save(filePath, ImageFormat.Png);
    this.filePath = filePath;
    saveSuccessful = true;
  }
  catch { }
  return saveSuccessful;
}
# endregion  // Public Methods
}

I forget the name of the tool, but Microsoft has a UI testing/automating tool that interacts with any Windows application, and they tap into the Windows accessibility (for disabled/handicapped users) to programatically interact with everything.

This might be of interest too: UI Automation Fundamentals (MSDN)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.