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I have this code:

MyObject = function(){
    this.field = null;

    this.build = function(){
        var my_url = "...";
        var my_data = "...";
        $.get(my_url, my_data, function(result){
           this.field = result;
        });
    }

    this.get = function(){
        return this.field;
    }
}

object = new MyObject();
object.build();
my_result = object.get() 

my_result now is null because when the inner function is executed this is not my object.
So, how can i set this.field with the $.get returned value???

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1  
please don't call your object Object! –  Alnitak Apr 20 '11 at 17:09
    
@Alnitak ok i'll call MyObject... –  bicccio Apr 20 '11 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the top of your constructor, do:

var self = this;

this creates a new scoped variable that refers to the current object.

Then in the AJAX call back do:

self.field = result;
share|improve this answer
    
I recommmend doing this inside the method this.build so that object.build.apply(scope, ...) doesn't break. –  Raynos Apr 20 '11 at 17:25
    
in practise if it mattered I'd probably do both. –  Alnitak Apr 20 '11 at 18:56
MyObject = function(){
    this.field = null;

    this.build = function(cb){
        var my_url = "...";
        var my_data = "...";
        var self = this;
        $.get(my_url, my_data, function(result){
           self.field = result;
           cb(result);
        });
    }

    this.get = function(){
        return this.field;
    }
}

object = new MyObject();
object.build(function(field) {
    console.log(object.get() === field);
});

I recommend you pass a callback to your build function so you can be notified immediatly when your field is set.

Also placing var self = this inside your method ensures that you can call object.build.call(scope, f) without it being bound to the wrong scope.

This pattern is particularly useful in inheritance when you want to call a method of another class.

share|improve this answer
    
pls elaborate on the scope issue - are you saying that you might specifically want to use a different scope than that of the constructed object itself? –  Alnitak Apr 20 '11 at 19:04
    
@Alnitak you might want to reuse it. its an OOP pattern. –  Raynos Apr 20 '11 at 19:09

In the future, try using the Module Pattern:

HERE IS THE MODULE PATTERN:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var myNamespace = (function($) {
        var publicInstances = {};

        // ***********************
        // myObject
        publicInstances.myObject = myObject;
        function myObject() {

            /// <summary>A pointer to this</summary>
            var self = this;

            this.someProperty = new String();

            this.initialize = function() {
                /// your code here
            }
            this.someMethod = function() {
                /// your code here
            }

            self.initialize();
        }

        return publicInstances;
    })(jQuery);


    jQuery(document).ready(function() {
        // Use would look like
        var myInstance = new myNamespace.myObject();
    });
</script>

HERE IS WHAT YOUR OBJECT MIGHT LOOK LIKE:

var myNamespace = (function($) 
{
    var publicInstances = {};

    // ***********************
    // myObject
    publicInstances.myObject = myObject;
    function myObject(url, data) {

        /// <summary>A pointer to this</summary>
        var self = this;
        /// <summary>Contains the result</summary>
        this.field = null; // Name this result instead.

        this.url = url;
        this.data = data;

        this.initialize = function() {
            /// Initialize whatever
        }
        this.build = function() {
            $.get(self.url, self.data, function(result) {
                self.field = result;
                cb(self.field);
            });
        }
        this.cb = function(result) {
            /// Do whatever
        }

        self.initialize();
    }

    return publicInstances;
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
that pattern is a bit over engineered and not that good. Still leaking into global scope. and your not opening yourself to async loaders. But it is better then just adhoc coding ! –  Raynos Apr 20 '11 at 19:15
    
I don't see what you mean by "leaking" into global scope. If you mean you would create a persistent object...I don't see that as bad. In fact, that is exactly what he wants to do. How's this? If you don't like it please post an better alternative? –  Prisoner ZERO Apr 26 '11 at 18:28
    
Additionally, the Module Pattern is widely used...and I got it from a John Resig example! –  Prisoner ZERO Apr 27 '11 at 13:15
    
@Raynos - There is a discussion of your comment going on at stackoverflow.com/questions/5951228/…. If you would like to participate? –  meouw May 10 '11 at 14:40
    
@meouw thanks for pointing that out. –  Raynos May 10 '11 at 15:25

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