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Hey guys, what i have now is this:

var Human=function(){
  this._a=Math.random();
};
(function() {
  var before_get = function(human) {
  };
  var before_set = function(human, v) {
  };
  Human.prototype={
    get A(){
      before_get(this);
      return this._a;
    },
    set A(v){
      before_set(this, v);
      this._a=v;
    }
  };
})();
alert(new Human().A); // test
alert(new Human().A); // test

and all's good except that i do not wish to expose the variable _a to anywhere else except the prototype. Ok i've did some searching and realised that that's not possible so I was wondering do we usually leave it as such (i mean do we just leave those _a variables flying around or is there a better solution)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as private in JavaScript, so this is not achievable. In general we do not have generic properties or setter/getters like other C#/Java have.

A pattern that can be used is closures instead of prototypes.

var Human = function() {
    var a = Math.random();
    var o = {};
    Object.defineProperties(o, {
        "A": {
             "get": function() {
                 return a;
             }, 
             "set": function(val) {
                 a = val;
             }
        }
    });
    return o;
}

In general though you shouldnt write properties to the prototype. The prototype should contain methods.

The only way to clean up this._a is as follows

var Human = (function() {
  var Human=function(){
    this._a=Math.random();
  };
  var before_get = function(human) {
  };
  var before_set = function(human, v) {
  };
  Human.prototype={
    getA(){
      before_get(this);
      return this._a;
    },
    setA(v){
      before_set(this, v);
      this._a=v;
    }
  };
  return function(args) {
     var h = new Human(args);
     return {
       getA: h.getA.bind(h),
       setA: h.setA.bind(h)
     }
  }
})();
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1  
but the problem with this method is that if i have 9999 Humans, i end up creating 9999 getters and 9999 setters.. –  Pacerier Apr 20 '11 at 18:22
    
@Pacerier that is true. But that is the only way to get a local variable for each of those 9999 humans. If each human need its own variable then each human needs a function with a reference to that variable. –  Raynos Apr 20 '11 at 18:24
    
@Raynos in my example (above) each human has its own variable, and all humans share a function with a reference to that variable (the beauty of the "this" variable). However the problem i have is that i could not find a way to expose variables only to the prototype and nothing else.. and thus i end up having those ugly "private" variables which are not so private.. so i was seeking a solution for it.. –  Pacerier Apr 20 '11 at 20:22
    
@Pacerier what you are asking for is impossible. The best you can do is return a proxy that does not publicly expores this._a –  Raynos Apr 20 '11 at 20:28
    
@Raynos heys what do you mean by a proxy, maybe this is what i want! –  Pacerier Apr 20 '11 at 20:58

Here is how you create the likes of a private/static variables using prototypal 'inheritance'. The trick is to define the prototype methods within the constructor (once). The price is getters/setters you have to execute. The profit is simplicity and a true prototypal solution (which after all is the real nature of the beast). And btw, here you create your 'getter/setter' only once, and it's there for all 999(999) instances you create from it.

function Human() {
    var  a = 'We are all Human',
         o = {}
         proto = Human.prototype;
    if (!proto.A) {
       //uncomment and create a few instances to see
       //this is only executed once
       //console.log('adding prototypes');
       proto.A = function() {return a;};
       proto.set = function(val) {a = val || a;};
       proto.setName = function(val) {this.name = val || ''};
       proto.getName = function(){
           if (!this.name) {this.setName('no name yet');}
           return this.name;};
    }
}

var Pete = new Human,
    Jean = new Human;

console.log(Pete.A()+':'+Jean.A()); 
      //|=> We are all Human:We are all Human
Pete.set(Pete.A()+' except Jean'));
console.log(Pete.A()+':'+Jean.A()); 
      //|=> We are all Human except Jean:We are all Human except Jean
Pete.setName('Hi, I am Pete. '+Pete.A());
Jean.setName('Hi, I am Jean. ' +Jean.A()+ '. Damn! thats me!');
console.log(Pete.name); 
      //|=> Hi, I am Pete. We are all Human except Jean
console.log(Jean.name); 
      //|=> Hi, I am Jean. We are all Human except Jean. Damn! thats me!

You have to realize that anyone can decide to assign something else to Human.prototype.A. But if they do that outside the constructor, the closure, and therefore a, is not available anymore.

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What have you have there is static and private. defining it in the constructor is a pain aswell. Just use a closure to hide a. But you do not have private to an object you have local to a prototype. –  Raynos Apr 20 '11 at 19:37
    
1. I think this uses a closure. 2. It's not more a pain then all patterns I've seen passing. 3. it's a create once use many times prototypal pattern which should be pretty efficient if someone wanted to create, say, 9999 instances. And 4 (bonus!), this works in all browsers. –  KooiInc Apr 20 '11 at 19:49
    
@Raynos: What have you have there is static and private. Now, how about There is no such thing as private in JavaScript, so this is not achievable? It at least resembles contradictory. Could you explain? –  KooiInc Apr 20 '11 at 20:02
    
heys this is cool however the variable _a must not be static. is there a way around it? (the only thing i want "static" is the getters/setters not the value itself) –  Pacerier Apr 20 '11 at 20:19
1  
@Kooilnc he wants instance properties which are not publicly available. local variables for each instance which are still accesible to the prototype –  Raynos Apr 20 '11 at 20:53

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