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I have a WinForms project and solution, with some class library projects also added to the same solution.

The WinForms project uses code in the class libraries. I've been using this app for about a year and it has always worked well.

However, today, I added some functionality to the class library but those changes do not appear in the running application. I also tried adding a new public method to one of the classes, but that method does not show up in Intellisense for the application.

This should be really simple to resolve but, with the way WinForms is automatically copying DLLs behind the scenes, I have no idea where the problem is. Everything I look at seems right to me. The code continues to work as thought it's using an old version of the DLL. But the DLL in my WinForms app's Bin directory has today's date.

Can anyone make a recommendation on where I should be looking for a solution to this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As per Michael's answer you might find that the assembly reference is not actually a project reference but rather to a specific path which isn't the path you compiled to (for example bin\Release).

Also, this might sound trivial, but double check that your solution's Configuration Properties are actually building the project when you use the Build function! I've turned off projects from building only to forget that I did so and then I got perplexed when their changes aren't in my app!

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Thanks, but I find this whole process to be poorly designed. What is the correct way to set a reference? Do I reference the project or the compiled DLL? And does the answer change for Debug vs. Release builds? –  Jonathan Wood Apr 20 '11 at 18:14
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If you have the code as part of your solution, then you should use a project reference since it'll ensure you won't have any issues between build types. Though with the added disadvantage that it may increase your compile time. The upside is that your dependencies will be automatically rebuilt if any of their dependencies have changed. –  Reddog Apr 20 '11 at 18:19

I would go into project properties, delete the reference, re-add it to verify your dll is coming from the location you believe it to be. Clean & rebuild project

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Thanks, but I find this whole process to be poorly designed. What is the correct way to set a reference? Do I reference the project or the compiled DLL? And does the answer change for Debug vs. Release builds? –  Jonathan Wood Apr 20 '11 at 18:16
    
If you are actively modifying the included project add it as a project reference. –  Michael Apr 20 '11 at 18:43

Have you put any of the class libraries in the GAC?

If a strong-named Assembly with the same AssemblyVersion were in the GAC, this would be used instead of the one in your solution.

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I'm quite certain I have not. But, then again, this whole layout seems to have been carefully crafted as a black box that is a complete mystery to the casual observer. –  Jonathan Wood Apr 20 '11 at 17:49

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