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When compiling this program, I was expecting the operator<< call to resolve to the one in the global namespace, but instead, the compiler reports an ambiguous overload. I thought non-dependent lookup occurred before the functions in namespaces that are included as potential matches due to argument dependent lookup. This seems to be the case for non-template functions.

Can someone explain?

#include <iostream>

class Foo
{};

namespace NS
{
    class Stream
    {};

    template <typename T>
    Stream& operator << ( Stream& s, T t)
    {
        std::cerr << "Namespace call!\n";
        return s;
    }
}

template<typename STREAM>
STREAM& operator << ( STREAM& s, Foo f )
{
    std::cerr << "Global NS call";
    return s;
}

/**
* This function (as opposed to the one above) is not ambiguous.  Why?

NS::Stream& operator << ( NS::Stream& s, Foo f )
{
    std::cerr << "Global NS call";
    return s;
}

*/

int main()
{
    Foo f;
    NS::Stream s;

    s << f;
    return 0;
}

Compiler Output:

test11.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test11.cpp:28: error: ambiguous overload for ‘operator<<’ in ‘s << f’
test11.cpp:18: note: candidates are: STREAM& operator<<(STREAM&, Foo) [with STREAM = NS::Stream]
test11.cpp:13: note:                 NS::Stream& NS::operator<<(NS::Stream&, T) [with T = Foo]
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3 Answers 3

The global namespace has no special priority. The problem with s << f is that both arguments are associated with a namespace: s with ::NS and f with ::.

Given that the global namespace is just like any other (except that it is always in scope, which does not matter here), the two function overloads are exactly tied for best match and there is nothing the compiler can do.

When using the IOStreams library, this problem is resolved by accepting parameters of type istream & or ostream &, without template parameterization.

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There is ambiguity because you have defined Stream inside namespace NS. If you define Stream in global namespace, then there will be no ambiguity.

The compiler will try to resolve which function to choose according to the arguments to the unqualified function and their associated namespaces. Refer to Section 3.4.2 - Argument-dependent name lookup, of ISO/IEC 14882:2003 standard. As one argument is defined in global namespace and one argument is defined in NS, the compiler does not know which function to use.

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There are two possible candidates for s << f: the global one and the namespace'd one. There is nothing to choose between those two for the C++ compiler, so it is ambiguous.

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