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I am quite bad at using "basic?" unix commands and this question puts my knowledge even more to test. What I would like to do is grep all IP adresses from a log (e.g. access.log from apache) and count how often they occur. Can I do that with one command or do I need to write a script for that?

Br, Paul Peelen

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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You'll need a short pipeline at least.

sed -e 's/\([0-9]\+\.[0-9]\+\.[0-9]\+\.[0-9]\+\).*$/\1/' -e t -e d access.log | sort | uniq -c

Which will print each IP (will only work with ipv4 though), sorted prefixed with the count.

I tested it with apache2's access.log (it's configurable though, so you'll need to check), and it worked for me. It assumes the IP-address is the first thing on each line.

The sed collects the IP-addresses (actually it looks for 4 sets of digits, with periods in between), and replaces the entire line with it. -e t continues to the next line if it managed to do a substitution, -e d deletes the line (if there was no IP address on it). sort sorts.. :) And uniq -c counts instances of consecutive identical lines (which, since we've sorted them, corresponds to the total count).

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Worked like a charm! Thanks :) –  Paul Peelen Apr 20 '11 at 20:18

you can do the following (where datafile is the name of the log file)

egrep '[[:digit:]]{1,3}\.[[:digit:]]{1,3}\.[[:digit:]]{1,3}\.[[:digit:]]{1,3}' datafile | sort | uniq -c

edit: missed the part about counting address, now added

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This fails, as egrep will print the whole line including timestamps, and each line will be unique, you need to single out the IP address and remove the rest of the line (or in some other way consider only the IP when checking uniqueness) –  falstro Jan 9 at 7:35

Using sed:

$ sed 's/.*\(<regex_for_ip_address>\).*/\1/' <filename> | sort | uniq -c

You can search and find regex available for ip address on Inernet and replace it with <regex_for_ip_address>. e.g. From answers to a related question on stackoverflow

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This might actually fail, as Dave Tarsi points out, it'll catch stuff like browser versions which are valid IP addresses. You need to know where the IP address is on the line (beginning), and only select those lines. –  falstro Jan 9 at 7:32

egrep '[[:digit:]]{1,3}(.[[:digit:]]{1,3}){3}' |awk '{print $1}'|sort|uniq -c

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This might actually fail, as Dave Tarsi points out, it'll catch stuff like browser versions which are valid IP addresses. You need to know where the IP address is on the line (beginning), and only select those lines. –  falstro Jan 9 at 7:33

The following is a script I wrote several years ago. It greps out addresses from apache access logs. I just tried it running Ubuntu 11.10 (oneiric) 3.0.0-32-generic #51-Ubuntu SMP Thu Mar 21 15:51:26 UTC 2013 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux It works fine. Use Gvim or Vim to read the resulting file, which will be called unique_visits, which will list the unique ips in a column. The key to this is in the lines used with grep. Those expressions work to extract the ip address numbers. IPV4 only. You may need to go through and update browser version numbers. Another similar script that I wrote for a Slackware system is here: http://www.perpetualpc.net/srtd_bkmrk.html

#!/bin/sh
#eliminate search engine referals and zombie hunters. combined_log is the original file
egrep '(google)|(yahoo)|(mamma)|(query)|(msn)|(ask.com)|(search)|(altavista)|(images.google)|(xb1)|(cmd.exe)|(trexmod)|(robots.txt)|(copernic.com)|(POST)' combined_log > search
#now sort them to eliminate duplicates and put them in order
sort -un search > search_sort
#do the same with original file
sort -un combined_log > combined_log_sort
#now get all the ip addresses. only the numbers
grep -o '[0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*' search_sort > search_sort_ip
grep -o '[0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*' combined_log_sort > combined_log_sort_ip
sdiff -s combined_log_sort_ip search_sort_ip > final_result_ip
#get rid of the extra column
grep -o '^\|[0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*[.][0-9][0-9]*' final_result_ip > bookmarked_ip
#remove stuff like browser versions and system versions
egrep -v '(4.4.2.0)|(1.6.3.1)|(0.9.2.1)|(4.0.0.42)|(4.1.8.0)|(1.305.2.109)|(1.305.2.12)|(0.0.43.45)|(5.0.0.0)|(1.6.2.0)|(4.4.5.0)|(1.305.2.137)|(4.3.5.0)|(1.2.0.7)|(4.1.5.0)|(5.0.2.6)|(4.4.9.0)|(6.1.0.1)|(4.4.9.0)|(5.0.8.6)|(5.0.2.4)|(4.4.8.0)|(4.4.6.0)' bookmarked_ip > unique_visits

exit 0
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cat access.log |egrep -o '[[:digit:]]{1,3}\.[[:digit:]]{1,3}\.[[:digit:]]{1,3}\.[[:digit:]]{1,3}' |uniq -c|sort
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