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I'm trying to change a private member by using a Privileged method that I defined. I created a simple class to give you an example of the current issue I'm having:

// Constructor
function Player(name) {
    // Private
    var achievements = [];

    function emptyArray(emptyThisArray) {
        emptyThisArray = [];
    };

    // Privileged
    this.restartGame = function() {
        this.score = 0;
        emptyArray(achievements);
    };
    this.addAchievement = function() {
        achievements[achievements.length] = "Medal " + achievements.length;
    };
    this.getAchievements = function() {
        return achievements;
    };

    // Public
    this.name = name;
    this.score = 0;
}

// Public
Player.prototype.getName = function() {
    return this.name;
};

var player1 = new Player("Ben");
player1.score = 100;
player1.addAchievement();
player1.addAchievement();
player1.getAchievements();

player1.restartGame(); // restart the game

player1.score; // returns 0
player1.getAchievements();  // return an array of two achievements: ["Medal 0", "Medal 1"] (should actually return an empty array)

When I try to execute the Privileged method restartGame the score will be correctly set to zero. But when I try to clear the private array (in this example achievements). The private array is not getting cleared. What is the correct way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have emptyArray() as this:

function emptyArray(emptyThisArray) {
    emptyThisArray = [];
};

That just sets the emptyThisArray variable to a new array and leaves the passed-in array unchanged. It should be this:

function emptyArray() {
    achievements = [];
};
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I got tagged with the right answer, but this is correct and was posted a minute before my answer. +1 –  Juan Mendes Apr 20 '11 at 21:20

Your emptyArray function should just be

function emptyArray(array) {
    array.length = 0;
};

or even better ...

function emptyArray() {
    achievements = [];
};

The way you have it now, you are setting a pointer to the achievements array to point to a new array, leaving the original array intact. Passing an array to a function creates another reference to the array, not a reference to the original variable.

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you're right : +1, but your first function does the same thing as user717664's, thus not solving the problem –  gion_13 Apr 20 '11 at 18:51
    
@gion_13 no, setting the "length" property to zero will actually clear the original array. –  Pointy Apr 20 '11 at 18:59
    
setting the array.length to zero did the trick, thanks! –  Mike Apr 20 '11 at 19:02
    
@Mike, since it's an internal function, there's no need to pass the array as an argument, there's only one array managed by that object. I think the second example is cleaner. –  Juan Mendes Apr 20 '11 at 19:29
    
Yes that is correct for this example. –  Mike Apr 20 '11 at 19:42

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