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I have a draggable item which if not dropped in a droppable will revert. This works well until a user drops an item in the droppable. If they decide they've made a mistake anytime they pull the draggable out it reverts to the droppable. I would prefer that on out and deactivate the draggable goes back to its original container.

My code is below but I have provided a sample on jsFiddle.

HTML

<div id="origin">
    <div id="draggable" class="ui-widget-content">
        <p>I revert when I'm not dropped</p>
    </div>
</div>
<div id="droppable" class="ui-widget-header">
    <p>Drop me here</p>
</div>

JavaScript

$(function() {
    $("#draggable").draggable({ 
        revert:  function(dropped) {
           var dropped = dropped && dropped[0].id == "droppable";
           if(!dropped) alert("I'm reverting!");
           return !dropped;
        } 
    }).each(function() {
        var top = $(this).position().top;
        var left = $(this).position().left;
        $(this).data('orgTop', top);
        $(this).data('orgLeft', left);
    });

    $("#droppable").droppable({
        activeClass: 'ui-state-hover',
        hoverClass: 'ui-state-active',
        drop: function(event, ui) {
            $(this).addClass('ui-state-highlight').find('p').html('Dropped!');
        },
        out: function(event, ui) {
                // doesn't work but something like this
                ui.draggable.mouseup(function () {
                var top = ui.draggable.data('orgTop');
                var left = ui.draggable.data('orgLeft');
                ui.position = { top: top, left: left };
            });
        }
    });
});
share|improve this question
1  
Unfortunately, for my purposes out fires too soon (the moment the draggable leaves.) Isn't that rather the purpose of out? Do you just want to find out if they mouseup while out? –  jcolebrand Apr 20 '11 at 19:04
    
@drachenstern good idea. I'll experiment w/ that in the out event, but either way doesn't solve the issue of the draggable reverting back to the droppable. –  ahsteele Apr 20 '11 at 19:10
    
Glad I could help, still not sure what I triggered in your head. I think tho, that the draggable loses it's "home" droppable once you move it. You may need to store that information in an ancillary method somewhere. –  jcolebrand Apr 20 '11 at 19:11
    
@drachenstern I was going for that w/ storing the original position. I just can't get it to use that instead of the it's new position in the droppable. :( btw: code is updated to reflect your great suggestion. –  ahsteele Apr 20 '11 at 19:16
    
You need two droppable regions. When you're not over either one, and you return !dropped, that's when you need to handle where to drop to. Don't do it on out or on mouseup. It doesn't have anywhere to put the reverted once you've dropped on the droppable zone. (alternately just remove the "position:relative" when you don't detect that you're over the droppable zone) –  jcolebrand Apr 20 '11 at 19:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 74 down vote accepted
+100

UPDATED to work with jQuery 1.9 version

$(function() {
    $("#draggable").draggable({
        revert : function(event, ui) {
            // on older version of jQuery use "draggable"
            // $(this).data("draggable")
            // on 2.x versions of jQuery use "ui-draggable"
            // $(this).data("ui-draggable")
            $(this).data("uiDraggable").originalPosition = {
                top : 0,
                left : 0
            };
            // return boolean
            return !event;
            // that evaluate like this:
            // return event !== false ? false : true;
        }
    });
    $("#droppable").droppable();
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for adding this solution. It works great. Was wondering if anybody could explain the finer details of it? –  listao Feb 26 '13 at 22:20
2  
@leetou: i have update the code and added hack explanation on demo site. ;) –  aSeptik Feb 27 '13 at 11:10
    
Amazing solve for this, nice explanation too. –  newe1344 Mar 10 '13 at 1:01
    
Thank you for updating this for jQuery 1.9! :) –  ahsteele Apr 25 '13 at 22:27
    
Ditto, thanks for the updated version, and the helpful explanation of the code. –  listao Nov 15 '13 at 15:54

In case anyone's interested, here's my solution to the problem. It works completely independently of the Draggable objects, by using events on the Droppable object instead. It works quite well:

$(function() {
    $(".draggable").draggable({
        opacity: .4,
        create: function(){$(this).data('position',$(this).position())},
        cursor:'move',
        start:function(){$(this).stop(true,true)}
    });

    $('.active').droppable({
        over: function(event, ui) {
            $(ui.helper).unbind("mouseup");
        },
        drop:function(event, ui){
            snapToMiddle(ui.draggable,$(this));
        },
        out:function(event, ui){
            $(ui.helper).mouseup(function() {
                snapToStart(ui.draggable,$(this)); 
            });
        }
    });
}); 

function snapToMiddle(dragger, target){
    var topMove = target.position().top - dragger.data('position').top + (target.outerHeight(true) - dragger.outerHeight(true)) / 2;
    var leftMove= target.position().left - dragger.data('position').left + (target.outerWidth(true) - dragger.outerWidth(true)) / 2;
    dragger.animate({top:topMove,left:leftMove},{duration:600,easing:'easeOutBack'});
}
function snapToStart(dragger, target){
    dragger.animate({top:0,left:0},{duration:600,easing:'easeOutBack'});
}
share|improve this answer

It's related about revert origin : to set origin when the object is drag : just use $(this).data("draggable").originalPosition = {top:0, left:0};

For example : i use like this

               drag: function() {
                    var t = $(this);
                    left = parseInt(t.css("left")) * -1;
                    if(left > 0 ){
                        left = 0;
                        t.draggable( "option", "revert", true );
                        $(this).data("draggable").originalPosition = {top:0, left:0};
                    } 
                    else t.draggable( "option", "revert", false );

                    $(".slider-work").css("left",  left);
                }
share|improve this answer

If you want to revert the element to the source position if it's not dropped inside a #droppable element, just save the original parent element of the draggable at the start of the script (instead of the position), and if you verify that it's not dropped into #droppable, then just restore the parent of #draggable to this original element.

So, replace this:

}).each(function() {
    var top = $(this).position().top;
    var left = $(this).position().left;
    $(this).data('orgTop', top);
    $(this).data('orgLeft', left);
});

with this:

}).each(function() {
    $(this).data('originalParent', $(this).parent())
});

Here, you'll have the original parent element of the draggable. Now, you have to restore it's parent in a precise moment.

drop is called every time the element is dragged out from the droppable, not at the stop. So, you're adding a lot of event callbacks. This is wrong, because you never clean the mouseup event. A good place where you can hook a callback and check if the element was dropped inside or outside the #droppable element, is revert, and you're doing it right now, so, just delete the drop callback.

When the element is dropped, and needs to know if it should be reverted or not, you know for sure that you'll not have any other interaction from the user until the new drag start. So, using the same condition you're using to know if it should revert or know, let's replace this alert with a fragment of code that: restores the parent element to the original div, and resets the originalPosition from the draggable internals. The originalPosition proeprty is setted at the time of _mouseStart, so, if you change the owner of the element, you should reset it, in order to make the animation of revert go to the proper place. So, let's set this to {top: 0, left: 0}, making the animation go to the origin point of the element:

revert: function(dropped) {
    var dropped = dropped && dropped[0].id == "droppable";
    if(!dropped) {
        $(this).data("draggable").originalPosition = {top:0, left:0}
        $(this).appendTo($(this).data('originalParent'))
    }
    return !dropped;
}

And that's it! You can check this working here: http://jsfiddle.net/eUs3e/1/

Take into consideration that, if in any jQuery's UI update, the behavior of revert or originalPosition changes, you'll need to update your code in order to make it work. Keep in mind that.

If you need a solution which doesn't make use of calls to the internals of ui.draggable, you can make your body an droppable element with greedy option defined as false. You'll have to make sure that your body elements take the full screen.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Gonzalo, I don't think the 'originalParent' logic is necessary here. When you drop a draggable, the underlying DOM structure doesn't actually change. –  BBonifield Apr 25 '11 at 21:31
    
Yep! You're right. It's not necessary :-) I'm used to work with ULs and LIs for draggables/droppables. Thanks! –  Gonzalo Larralde Apr 25 '11 at 23:16
    
what you have here definitely works, but the readd is a bit jerky in that if used with an unordered list. By appending it jumps to the bottom. That said this is the more readable solution. From what I can tell drop is only called when the element is actually dropped. Am I missing something? –  ahsteele Apr 26 '11 at 4:35
1  
@ahsteele perhaps you can provide the actual DOM you're trying to work with. It might help us to give you a better solution. –  BBonifield Apr 28 '11 at 12:55

I'm not sure if this will work for your actual use, but it works in your test case - updated at http://jsfiddle.net/sTD8y/27/ .

I just made it so that the built-in revert is only used if the item has not been dropped before. If it has been dropped, the revert is done manually. You could adjust this to animate to some calculated offset by checking the actual CSS properties, but I'll let you play with that because a lot of it depends on the CSS of the draggable and it's surrounding DOM structure.

$(function() {
    $("#draggable").draggable({
        revert:  function(dropped) {
             var $draggable = $(this),
                 hasBeenDroppedBefore = $draggable.data('hasBeenDropped'),
                 wasJustDropped = dropped && dropped[0].id == "droppable";
             if(wasJustDropped) {
                 // don't revert, it's in the droppable
                 return false;
             } else {
                 if (hasBeenDroppedBefore) {
                     // don't rely on the built in revert, do it yourself
                     $draggable.animate({ top: 0, left: 0 }, 'slow');
                     return false;
                 } else {
                     // just let the built in revert work, although really, you could animate to 0,0 here as well
                     return true;
                 }
             }
        }
    });

    $("#droppable").droppable({
        activeClass: 'ui-state-hover',
        hoverClass: 'ui-state-active',
        drop: function(event, ui) {
            $(this).addClass('ui-state-highlight').find('p').html('Dropped!');
            $(ui.draggable).data('hasBeenDropped', true);
        }
    });
});
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