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It's possible to do that without copy containers' data?:

template<typename T> //we know only the type return by iterator
class Foo {
private:
    I b; //or some base class of iterator or own generic iterator
    I e; //what should be 'I'?
public:
    template<typename I>
    Foo(begin, end) {
        b = begin;
        e = end;
    }
    void find(T value) {
        while(b != e) {
            ...
            ++b;
        }
        return NULL;
    }
};
//...
//this can't be changed
std::vector<int> vec;
Foo<int> foo1(vec.begin(), vec.end());
std::list<double> list;
Foo<double> foo2(list.begin(), list.end());
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closed as not a real question by Bo Persson, GManNickG, Mark B, phooji, Graviton Apr 21 '11 at 3:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
@samadhi: Is what possible without copying a container's data? –  phooji Apr 20 '11 at 19:19
1  
Like I asked in your last question: why? What's with the random restrictions to write heterodox code? In any case, you want type erasure. –  GManNickG Apr 20 '11 at 19:21
    
I don't get it..What do you want to do? –  Kiril Kirov Apr 20 '11 at 19:21
1  
Why are you trying to shove find into a member function, when it clearly works better as a free function? See std::find. –  GManNickG Apr 20 '11 at 19:27
    
It's only example. Question is: how store in class right iterator? This only playing with possibility of language. –  anagamin Apr 20 '11 at 19:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you really want to be able to declare the template dependent only in the type of the data contained in the container, and at the same time you want to be able to store any type of iterator (i.e. iterator into any type of container), the solution is performing type erasure on the iterators.

If you can bring some external library, that has been done in adobe libs as any_iterator. Basically you define a base class that defines the iterator interface that you need with dynamic polymorphism (i.e. virtual methods), and then implement that interface with a template that takes the appropriate type:

template <typename T>
struct any_iterator {
   // all typedefs for an iterator here, including:
   typedef T value_type;

   virtual ~any_iterator() {}
   virtual any_iterator& operator++() = 0;
   virtual value_type& operator*() = 0;
   // ... rest of the methods
};
template <typename Iterator>
class any_iterator_impl : any_iterator< typename Iterator::value_type > {
   iterator it;
public:
   // all the typedefs
   typedef Iterator iterator;
   typedef typename iterator::value_type value_type;

   // actual implementation of the interface
   any_iterator_impl( Iterator it ) : it(it) {}
   virtual any_iterator_impl& operator++() { ++it; return *this; }
   virtual value_type& operator*() { return *it; }
   // ... and all the rest of the interface
};

And then use that in your class:

template <typename T>
class Foo {
   std::unique_ptr<any_iterator> it, end; // in real code use smart pointers here
public:
   template <typename Iterator>
   Foo( Iterator b, Iterator e ) {
      static_assert( is_same< typename Iterator::value_type, T>::value );
      it = new any_iterator_impl<Iterator>( begin );
      end = new any_iterator_impl<Iterator>( end );
   }
   // rest of the class
};

The code snippets are only for exhibition, they are not production code, have not been compiled and have a fair amount of don't do's (raw pointers, iterators can become invalidated at any point during the lifetime of the object...), but is intended to give you an idea of the work that you would need to perform type erasure on the iterators. Then again, take a look at the linked adobe library for a more thought out proposal.

If you are curious about it, it is the same approach taken in std::function or boost::any. One of the advantages is that you can actually use the same Foo class with different families of iterators in different situations. On the other hands, it requires dynamic dispatch, but that should not be problematic in most situations.

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Given the way you're trying to call the constructor:

std::vector<int> vec;
Foo<int> foo1(vec.begin(), vec.end());
std::list<double> list;
Foo<double> foo2(list.begin(), list.end());

...you would do this:

template<typename Iter> //we know only the type return by iterator
class Foo {
private:
    Iter b; //or some base class of iterator or own generic iterator
    Iter e; //what should be 'I'?

That is, if you were store an iterator in your class at all. Most of the time, you would not. Aside from the fact that in many cases an iterator can become invalidated at least-expected times, it's just a clumsy design.

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Your code doesn't seem to make much sense. I'd tend to agree with GMan that what you're trying to do probably isn't useful. There are, however, cases when vaguely similar things make sense. When they do, you typically use the iterator type as the template argument:

template<class inIt> 
class Foo { 
    inIt begin;
    inIt end;
public:
    Foo(inIt b, inIt e) : begin(b), end(e) {}
    bool find(typename inIt::value_type v) { 
        while (b!=e) {
           if (*b == v)
               return true;
            ++b;
        }
        return false;
    }
};

This does depend on the iterator type containing a typedef for its value_type, which is true of the iterators for standard containers like vector and list. You can (could) write your own iterators that don't do that though, which would make code like this next to impossible (which, of course, is why the standard library works the way it does).

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