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Is it possible to hide some member functions in a template class? Let's imagine we have something like:

template <class T>
class Increment
{
public:
    void init(T initValue)
    {
         mValue = initValue;
    }  

    T increment()
    {
        ++mValue;
    }

    T increment(T delta)
    {
        mValue += delta;
    }
private:
    T mValue;
};

The objective is to use this class in a way that, in certain cases we only see the increment() function and in some other cases we only see the increment(T) member function. To do that, I can think about something with SFINAE:

class MultipleIncrement
{
    typedef int MultipleIncrement_t;
};

class SingleIncrement
{
    typedef int SingleIncrement_t;
};

template <class T, class Q>
class Increment
{
public:
    void init(T initValue)
    {
        mValue = initValue;
    }

    T increment(typename Q::SingleIncrement_t = 0)
    {
        ++mValue;
    }

    T increment(T delta, typename Q::MultipleIncrement_t = 0)
    {
        mValue += delta;
    }
private:
    T mValue;
}

And then use my template like, for example:

Increment<long, MultipleIncrement>

However, the compiler is not letting me do this. Is there any other way in which this is feasible? Would it also work if the member function is actually the constructor?

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Out of interest what compiler are you using? –  briantyler Apr 20 '11 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In this case, I would prefer using template specialization. Would something like this help you?

struct SingleIncrement;
struct MultipleIncrement;

template <
    class T, 
    class Policy = SingleIncrement // default template param
>
class Increment
{
    T mValue;
public:
    Increment(T initValue)
    :   mValue(initValue)
    {}

    T increment()
    {
        ++mValue;
    }
};

// template specialization for MultipleIncrement
template <class T>
class Increment<T,MultipleIncrement>
{
    T mValue;
public:
    Increment(T initValue)
    :   mValue(initValue)
    {}

    T increment(T delta)
    {
        mValue += delta;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
It is indeed an aproach; the problem is that "init" is not the only member function that must be initialized; quite the opposite, there are a lot of common functions that would be repeated, unless I start thinking about inheritance... –  Marda Apr 20 '11 at 19:27
1  
I would try to make use of inheritance to avoid reimplementing common function and then use template specialization to use orthogonal types. –  evnu Apr 20 '11 at 19:29
1  
Template specialization for MultipleIncrement would be declared like this: template<class T> class Increment<T,MultipleIncrement> {...} –  Serge Dundich Apr 20 '11 at 19:36

Template specialization is good. Inheritance sounds better. Have you considered templating on the inherited base class? (Or is this now considered a faux pax?)

#define SHOW(X)  cout << # X " = " << (X) << endl

template <class T>
class A
{
public:
  void foo(T t) {SHOW(t); }
};

template <class T, class BASE>
class B : public BASE
{
public:
  void bar(T t) {SHOW(t); }
};

int
main()
{
  B<int,A<int> > b;
  b.foo(1);
  b.bar(2);
}
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