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I need to get the first word after slash in a url in javascript, I assume using a regex would be ideal.

Here's an idea of what the URLs can possibly look like :

In bold is what I need the regex to match for each scenario, so basically only the first portion after the slash, no matter how many further slashes there are.

I'm at a complete loss here, appreciate the help.

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4  
Technically, the first word after a slash in your examples is 'mysite'... What you want is the first part of the url's path component. –  Marc B Apr 20 '11 at 19:20

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

JavaScript with RegEx. This will match anything after the first / until we encounter another /.

window.location.pathname.replace(/^\/([^\/]*).*$/, '$1');
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Non-regex.

var link = document.location.href.split('/');
alert(link[3]);
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Exploding an url in javascript can be done using the official rfc2396 regex:

var url = "http://www.domain.com/path/to/something?query#fragment";
var exp = url.split(/^(([^:\/?#]+):)?(\/\/([^\/?#]*))?([^?#]*)(\?([^#]*))?(#(.*))?/);

This will gives you:

["", "http:", "http", "//www.domain.com", "www.domain.com", "/path/to/something", "?query", "query", "#fragment", "fragment", ""]

Where you can, in your case, easily retrieve you path with:

var firstPortion = exp[5].split("/")[1]
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My regex is pretty bad, so I will improvise with a less efficient solution :P

// The first part is to ensure you can handle both URLs with the http:// and those without

x = window.location.href.split("http:\/\/")
x = x[x.length-1];
x = x.split("\/")[1]; //Result is in x
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Try with:

var url = 'http://mysite.com/section-with-dashes/';
var section = url.match(/^http[s]?:\/\/.*?\/([a-zA-Z-_]+).*$/)[0];
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I maybe wrong, but I think it should be [1]; jsfiddle.net/AvHd3 –  Squirrl Mar 4 at 1:40

Here is the quick way to get that in javascript

var urlPath = window.location.pathname.split("/");
if (urlPath.length > 1) {
  var first_part = urlPath[1];
  alert(first_part); 
}
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$url = 'http://mysite.com/section/subsection';

$path = parse_url($url, PHP_URL_PATH);

$components = explode('/', $path);

$first_part = $components[0];
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1  
For some reason, I'm thinking that the JavaScript interpreter won't like your PHP solution. –  Jim Mischel Apr 20 '11 at 19:48
1  
After blinking a few times, you're probably right... But since there's a lot of people who think Javascript can execute on the server, I can pretend that PHP can execute on the client :) –  Marc B Apr 20 '11 at 19:55
2  
They are not totally wrong if considering Node.js ;-) –  Flavien Volken Jan 17 '12 at 14:32

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